Wernicke's area


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Related to Wernicke's area: Wernicke's encephalopathy, Wernicke's aphasia, Broca's area, Wernicke's syndrome

area

 [a´re-ah] (pl. a´reae, areas) (L.)
a limited space or plane surface.
acoustic a's auditory areas.
association a's areas of the cerebral cortex (excluding primary areas) connected with each other and with the neothalamus; they are responsible for higher mental and emotional processes, including memory, learning, speech, and the interpretation of sensations.
Area. Functional areas and lobes of the cerebrum.
auditory a's two contiguous areas of the temporal lobe in the region of the anterior transverse temporal gyrus, known as the primary and secondary auditory areas. Called also acoustic areas.
Broca's motor speech area an area comprising parts of the opercular and triangular portions of the inferior frontal gyrus; injury to this area may result in motor aphasia.
Broca's parolfactory area a small area of cortex on the medial surface of each cerebral hemisphere, between the anterior and posterior parolfactory sulci. Called also area subcallosa.
Brodmann's a's specific occipital and preoccipital areas of the cerebral cortex, distinguished by differences in the arrangement of their six cellular layers, and identified by numbering each area. They are considered to be the seat of specific functions of the brain.
catchment area
1. the geographical region drained by one body of water.
2. the area whose residents are served by a specialized health care agency. Called also catchment.
contact area proximal surface.
embryonic area (germinal area) (area germinati´va) embryonic disk.
Kiesselbach's area an area on the anterior part of the nasal septum, richly supplied with capillaries, and a common site of epistaxis (nosebleed).
language area any nerve center of the cerebral cortex, usually in the dominant hemisphere, controlling the understanding or use of language.
motor area any area of the cerebral cortex primarily involved in stimulating muscle contractions; most are in the precentral gyri. See also premotor area, sensorimotor area, and Broca's motor speech area.
motor speech area see Broca's motor speech area and Wernicke's area.
occupational performance a's categories of activities that make up an individual's occupational performance; they include activities of daily living, work activities, and play or leisure activities. A delay in any of these areas may be addressed by occupational therapy intervention.
olfactory area
1. a general area of the brain, including the olfactory bulb, tract, and trigone, the anterior portion of the gyrus cinguli, and the uncus.
postcentral area (postrolandic area) an area just posterior to the central sulcus of the cerebral hemisphere that is the primary receiving area for general sensations.
precentral area primary somatomotor area.
premotor area an area of the motor cortex of the frontal lobe immediately in front of the precentral gyrus.
primary area areas of the cerebral cortex comprising the motor and sensory regions.
primary receiving a's the areas of the cerebral cortex that receive the thalamic projections of the primary sensory modalities such as vision, hearing, and smell. Called also sensory areas.
primary somatomotor area an area in the posterior part of the frontal lobe just anterior to the central sulcus; different regions control motor activity of specific parts of the body. Called also precentral area and rolandic area.
projection a's those areas of the cerebral cortex that receive the most direct projection of the sensory systems of the body.
sensorimotor area the cortex of the precentral and postcentral gyri, which are the motor area and the primary receiving area for general sensations, respectively.
sensory a's primary receiving areas.
sensory association area an association area around the borders of a primary receiving area, where sensory stimuli are interpreted.
silent area an area of the brain in which pathologic conditions may occur without producing symptoms.
somatic sensory area (somatosensory area) either of two cortical projection areas in or near the postcentral gyrus where conscious perception of somatic sensations occurs, known as the first or primary somatosensory area and the second or secondary somatosensory area.
area subcallo´sa (subcallosal area) Broca's parolfactory area.
area under the curve (AUC) the area enclosed between the curve of a probability with nonnegative values and the axis of the quality being measured; of the total area under a curve, the proportion that falls between two given points on the curve defines a probability density function.
visual a's three areas (first, second, and third visual areas) of the visual cortex. The first visual area is better known as the striate cortex.
vocal area rima glottidis.
Wernicke's area originally a name for a speech center thought to be confined to the posterior part of the superior temporal gyrus next to the transverse temporal gyri; the term now refers to a wider zone that also includes the supramarginal and angular gyri.

Wernicke's area

(vĕr′nĭ-kēz, -kəz)
n.
An area in the posterior left hemisphere of the brain cortex at the sylvian fissure that is important for language comprehension and speech.

Wernicke's area

An area in the dominant hemisphere of the brain that recalls, recognizes, and interprets words and other sounds in the process of using language.
Synonym: Wernicke's center
See also: Wernicke, Carl
References in periodicals archive ?
While targeted testing is preferable, often both Broca's and Wernicke's areas are activated during both productive and receptive language tasks, making it not essential to tailor the language task to the lesion location.
When reading, impulses are sent from the occipital region to the angular gyrus where reading is changed to "hearing" and from here to Wernicke's area, where thoughts are formed.
Unfortunately for phrenology, experimental science proved, even as early as the 1870's with the discovery of Wernicke's area, that its claims were unfounded.
Over time, while Wernicke's area remained damaged, an adjacent area took on this cognitive task.
Wernicke's area is located adjacent to the area associated with the reception of auditory stimuli Heschle's gyrus, and Broca's area is located close to the cortical areas assigned to the motor control of the muscles of articulation.
Wernicke's area is the part responsible for understanding speech.
The earliest progress in this area was to isolate the comprehension functions in Wernicke's area and the distinct production functions in Broca's area.
The primary auditory area, also known as Wernicke's area, is located in the superior temporal gyrus.
Scientists have long thought that human speech is processed towards the back of the brain's cerebral cortex, behind auditory cortex where all sounds are received - a place famously known as Wernicke's area after the German neurologist who proposed this site in the late 1800s based on his study of brain injuries and strokes.
This region came to be known as Wernicke's area, connected to Broca's area by a neural pathway called the arcuate fasciculus.