Weber test


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Weber test

 [va´ber]
a tuning fork test made by placing a vibrating tuning fork at some point on the midline of the head and noting whether it is perceived as heard in the midline (normal) or referred to either ear (middle ear disease). If it is heard better in the affected ear, there is conductive hearing loss; if it is heard better in the normal ear, there is sensorineural hearing loss.
Weber test. A, Normal—sound is equally loud in both ears; sound does not lateralize. B, Conductive loss—sound lateralizes to “poorer” ear owing to background room noise, which masks hearing in normal ear. “Poorer” ear (the one with conductive loss) is not distracted by background noise, thus has a better chance to hear bone-conducted sound. Examples: transient conductive loss with serous or purulent otitis media. C, Sensorineural loss—sound lateralizes to “better” ear or unaffected ear. Poorer ear (the one with nerve loss) is unable to perceive the sound. From Jarvis, 2000.

We·ber test

(vā'bĕr),
test in which the stem of a vibrating tuning fork is placed on the midline of the head to ascertain in which ear the sound is heard by bone conduction. The sound will be perceived in the affected ear when a unilateral conductive hearing loss is present or in the unaffected ear when there is a unilateral sensorineural hearing loss. The result of this test is combined with the result of the Rinne test to interpretation of the type of hearing loss.

Weber test

Neurology A hearing test in which a vibrating tuning fork is used to evaluate hearing by placing it on the middle of the head–the vertex. See Hearing test.

We·ber test

(vā'ber test)
Test in which the stem of a vibrating tuning fork is placed on the midline of the head to ascertain in which ear the sound is heard by bone conduction.

Weber test

A hearing test using a vibrating tuning fork which is held at various points along the midline of the skull and face.

Weber,

Friedrich Eugen, German otologist, 1823-1891.
Weber test - determines unilateral hearing loss by using a vibrating tuning fork.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Weber test was nonlocalizing, and the Rinne test was positive on the right and equivocal on the left.
The Weber test was midline, and the Rinne test demonstrated air conduction greater than bone conduction bilaterally.
On tuning fork testing, the Weber test lateralized to the right and the Rinne test was negative bilaterally.
On tuning fork testing, the Weber test lateralized to the right, and the Rinne test was positive bilaterally.
A Weber test lateralized to the right, and a Rinne test was negative bilaterally.
A Weber test lateralized to the left, and a Rinne test was positive on the right but negative on the left, consistent with a left-sided conductive hearing loss.
Otoscopy revealed a normal tympanic membrane, a Weber test to the right, and a negative Rinne test at both 512 and 1,024 Hz.
The audiometric Weber test should be used in these cases, and nonmasked bone thresholds should be used to determine the actual level of the cochlear reserve.
The Weber test lateralized to the involved ear, and air conduction was equal to bone conduction with the 512-Hz tuning fork.
The Weber test lateralized to the right ear, and the bone conduction was greater than the air conduction.
A Weber test lateralized to the involved ear, and air conduction was superior to bone conduction with the 512 tuning fork, in both ears.
Findings on physical examination were significant only for a Weber test that lateralized to the right ear at 512 Hz.