Warburg effect


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Warburg effect

The observation—first made by Otto Heinrich Warburg—that most malignant cells get their energy from anaerobic metabolism, at rates of glycolysis of up to 200-fold greater than oxidative metabolism of pyruvate in mitochondria. This effect led Warburg to assume that the fundamental change in cancer was metabolic rather than genetic. Some practitioners of alternative forms of healthcare continue to believe the Warburg effect can be exploited by reducing the energy available to malignant cells using hydrazine sulphate and other agents.

Warburg effect

The reliance of most cancer cells on glycolysis rather than oxidation to meet their metabolic needs.
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It works by reversing the Warburg effect, and targets the energy source of the cancer cell itself.
This shift in metabolism is known as the Warburg Effect.
Cancer researchers have a renewed interest in cancer cells' abnormal metabolism of sugar, known as the Warburg effect.
This edition has been revised and updated to include recent advances and information on the tumor microenvironment, metastatic dissemination, tumor immunology, cancer stem cells, the epithelial-mesenchymal transition, multi-step tumorigenesis, invasion and metastasis, mutation of cancer cell genomes, epigenetic contributions, microRNA involvement, and the Warburg effect, with more on traditional therapy and a new list of key techniques.
1970: Pedersen and his group discovered that cancers exhibiting the Warburg effect have a reduced respiration rate relative to their tissue of origin.
The observation, called the Warburg effect, demonstrated that the normal energy producing processes in the cell are disrupted in cancer cells, preventing them from using metabolic pathways in the cell's mitochondria (often called the cell's "power plants").
This result is consistent with protein breakdown and utilization as well as the Warburg effect in kidney cancer tumors.
in aerobic conditions most cancer cells display a high rate of glycolysis with lactate production in the cytosol, known as the Warburg effect.
These cancerous microenvironments are a result of the well understood unique glycolytic metabolism associated with cancer cells, referred to as the Warburg Effect, which was first described in the early 1900's and is the basis of the widely-used PET scan cancer detection method today.
Max is associated with MYC, a gene that drives tumor growth and the Warburg Effect in cancer.
All hallmarks of cancer including the Warburg effect can be linked to impaired respiration and energy metabolism," he writes (p.
It will be instructive to see if the degree of reversal of the Warburg effect by BPM 31510 correlates with clinical outcomes.