Wangensteen

Wan·gen·steen

(wan'gen-stēn),
Owen H., U.S. surgeon, 1898-1981. See: Wangensteen drainage, Wangensteen suction, Wangensteen tube.
References in periodicals archive ?
and Sarah Davidson Wangensteen Chair in Experimental Surgery at the University of Minnesota, Minneapolis.
Tesse A, Al-Massarani G, Wangensteen R, Reitenbach S, Martinez MC, Andriantsitohaina R.
Many nursing authors have proposed that critical thinking should be viewed as a developmental process that evolves with student experience and changes in context (Brunt, 2005; Drennan, 2009; Feng, Chen, Chen, & Pal, 2010; Rapps, Riegel, & Glaser, 2001; Wangensteen, Johansson, Bjorkstrom, & Nordstrom, 2010).
Arnlaug Wangensteen of Aspetar was placed second with a time of 9:29 and Raimey Olthuis won the third place (10:03).
NEW YORK, May 28 /PRNewswire/ -- Money management firm Integre Advisors has announced the addition of Dan McCarthy and Nels Wangensteen to its investment team.
Wollenberg and Ivar Wangensteen, Transmission Management in the Deregulated Environment, Proceedings of the IEEE, Vol.
Direct surgical access to the heart had been made possible by the introduction of new technologies, notably the heart-lung machine and hypothermia, by Wangensteen and Lillihei in Minnesota in the 1950s.
Owen Wangensteen found the right glint of eccentricity in my eye and signed me on.
I thank archivists Christiane Pfanz-Sponagel of BASF AG (Ludwigshafen, Germany) and Hans-Hermann Pogarell and Michael Frings of Bayer AG (Leverkusen, Germany) for providing historical corporate documents; the staff of the Wangensteen Historical Library at the University of Minnesota, Minneapolis; and Pat Erwin of the Plummer Library at the Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn.
It is the nature of research that innovation is a process of trial and error, and even the most illustrious and respected surgical innovators occasionally have missed the mark--the most celebrated example in recent times may be the gastric freezing work of Owen Wangensteen.
Wangensteen Historical Library of Biology and Medicine, Minneapolis, which was published in a six-volume set between 1741 and 1750.