bipedalism

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Related to Walking upright: bipedalism, Bipedal locomotion

bipedalism

a mode of locomotion found in many primates (particularly man) and birds, in which only the hind limbs are used in walking. True bipedalism (i.e. where locomotion is normally bipedal) has required evolutionary changes to the vertebral column and pelvis, with their associated musculature. A principal advantage of bipedalism would seem to be that the forelimbs can become modified for a nonwalking function, e.g. tool handling in man, flight in birds.

bipedalism

habitual weight-bearing and locomotion on paired lower limbs
References in periodicals archive ?
DeSilva's study, which took him to Uganda twice to film chimpanzees as they climbed trees, fits into a vein of research trying to understand when and how man's ancestors became bipedal, or started walking upright on two feet.
But many of the things which are unique to humans - such as a descended larynx, walking upright, fat beneath the skin, and most obviously an extremely large brain - it seems can best be accounted for as adaptations to extended periods in an aquatic environment," he added.
Another photo from the handout, three weeks after the attack, shows Poppo walking upright, sporting a hospital gown, with the assistance of two hospital staff at his sides.
He saw me walking upright and true again and asked what I had done.
The haunting sequence of images shows that, as he steps out from behind a van, Ben at first appears to be walking upright and unharmed.
We are taken through our evolution from when we came down from the trees and began walking upright all the way through to establishing camps and forging tools.
But now a research team suggests humans began walking upright while still living in the trees, and that they developed their two-footed skills millions of years earlier than scientists previously thought.
Ample evidence has shown that australopithecines were walking upright by this time, but the first traces of this skeleton - the four bones of an instep and beginning of the big toe - suggested that this species also was capable of grasping and climbing like a chimpanzee.
This new molecule sprang from nowhere at a time when our species was undergoing dramatic changes: living longer, walking upright, learning how to use tools and how to communicate.
Whether the species trucked across savannas has major implications for understanding how and why human ancestors began walking upright.
Her dad stroked his chin and said earnestly: "Well, many years ago, there were monkeys which came down from the trees and started walking upright, and from them, the human race evolved.
Bruce says the discovery could revolutionise the way we see human evolution and for the first time suggests how walking upright occurred.