Wade-Giles


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Related to Wade-Giles: Pinyin

Wade-Giles

one of the techniques used in romanizing the Chinese spoken word. Used extensively in the preparation of veterinary acupuncture literature.
References in periodicals archive ?
El Wade-Giles se sirve de un numero reducido de letras del alfabeto latino, al utilizar digrafos como ch y tz, y en particular, al representar la aspiracion de consonantes mediante un apostrofo.
In comparison, in the Wade-Giles romanization method for Mandarin, a hyphen is placed between the two words--as in "Yo-Yo Ma"--to indicate their connection.
Besides the above merits, the book adopts pinyin system, instead of the older Wade-Giles system, for romanization of Chinese characters; this is a good and wise choice.
Ch'ing follows the Wade-Giles system which was prevalent in the West during much of the 20th century and which is still in use, especially by the older generation of scholars who have not changed their ways.
However, seemingly to key his translations with the earlier work of Lin Yutang, Ye utilizes the Wade-Giles romanization, which may well confuse students more familiar with Hanyu pinyin, and despite the relative ease of doing so, includes neither Chinese characters within the text or in a glossary.
This fiscal year 2002 annual report of the Library of Congress (LC) Cataloging Directorate covers the following topics: (1) production and productivity; (2) arrearage reduction; (3) the aftermath of the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001; (4) cooperative cataloging programs; (5) conversion of LC records in Chinese from Wade-Giles to pinyin romanization; (6) labeling of hardbound books; (7) staffing and personnel management; (8) cataloging policy; (9) Electronic Resources Cataloging/ Library of Congress Action Plan; (10) Bibliographic Enrichment Advisory Team; (11) Cataloging in Publication; (12) Dewey Decimal Classification; (13) support for the LC ILS and automation; (14) training and outreach; and (15) collaboration with other directorates.
The Wade-Giles system of romanization, widely used throughout most of the 20th century, was expected to be replaced by the Pinyin system beginning October 1.
61-66), where Dodgshon presents a wild confusion of pinyin, Wade-Giles, and other unidentifiable and hitherto unattested romanizations of Chinese names and terms.
It is also exasperating to find a scholarly author with an interest in China treating Pinyin and Wade-Giles trans-literations quite so arbitrarily.
The Wade-Giles system of romanizing Chinese ideograms is also used in Taiwan.