vulvar vestibulitis syndrome


Also found in: Acronyms.

vulvar vestibulitis syndrome

The presence of severe pain on pressing or touching the vestibule of the vagina or on attempted vaginal entry. Physical findings of localized erythema are limited to the mucosa of the vestibule. Although the etiology is unknown, the syndrome often develops in women who have intractable moniliasis or who are receiving long-term antibiotic therapy. No therapy, including vestibulectomy, has been 100% effective. See: vulvodynia

Vulvar vestibulitis syndrome; VVS

Vulval vestibulitis; vulvar dysesthesia; inflammation of the vestibule.
Mentioned in: Vulvodynia
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References in periodicals archive ?
All of the women enrolled in the study had a prior diagnosis of vulvar vestibulitis syndrome.
candidate in psychology at the university, presented additional data from the same investigation linking dyadic adjustment to psychological distress and sexual impairment in women with vulvar vestibulitis syndrome.
The analyses also linked higher levels of state anxiety to increased dysfunctional dyadic adjustment, even after controlling for psychological distress and intensity of pain, suggesting that dyadic adjustment is a "powerful predictor of sexual impairment in women with vulvar vestibulitis syndrome, despite their pain intensity," Ms.
Increased intraepithelial innervation in women with vulvar vestibulitis syndrome," Gynecological and Obstetrics Investigation 46 (1998):256-260; LV Westrom and R.
N Bohm-Starke, M Hilliges, C Falconer, et al, "Neurochemical characterization of the vestibular nerves in women with vulvar vestibulitis syndrome," Gynecologic and Obstetrics Investigation 48 (1999):270-275.
N Bohm-Starke, M Hilliges, G Brodda-Jansen, et al, "Psychophysical evidence of nociceptor sensitisation in vulvar vestibulitis syndrome," Pain 94 (2001):177-183.
Treatment of vulvar vestibulitis syndrome with electromyographic biofeedback of pelvic floor musculature," Journal of Reproductive Medicine 40 (1995):283-290.
Association between sensory testing, treatment choice, and subsequent pain reduction in vulvar vestibulitis syndrome," Journal of Pain 5 (2004):226-232.
It has previously been observed that women with vulvar vestibulitis syndrome have increased counts of mast cells and chronic inflammatory cells in biopsied vulvar vaginal tissues.
And he's more convinced than ever that Candida albicans is a key player in idiopathic vulvar vestibulitis syndrome.
He and associates prospectively evaluated 24 patients who had symptoms of vulvar vestibulitis syndrome for at least 6 months and a positive HPV detected by PCR.