vital center


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vi·tal cen·ter

center essential to life; usually refers to the centers located in the medulla oblongata that are necessary for the maintenance of respiration and circulation.

vital center

Any of the centers in the medulla concerned with respiration, heart rate, or blood pressure.
See also: center
References in periodicals archive ?
ACCORDING TO FRED SIEGEL, THE political and cultural snobbery that informs The Vital Center lives on in the hauteur of those "who expect, given their putative expertise, to be obeyed"--and this attitude has proven to be "the undoing of American liberalism.
By the 1960s the vital center had fragmented under the weight of these contradictions and the new politically active groups that emerged out of them.
Even then, at the start of the Cold War, some sense of this totalitarian vulnerability led Schlesinger to reject hysterical anti-Communism and, in The Vital Center, to forecast with stunning accuracy the coming nationalistic splits within the Communist world.
In seeking to govern from the vital center, the president is returning to his New Democratic roots.
After its expulsion from Poland in 1660, Socinianism found a new and vital center among the Dutch, whose intellectual and mercantile reach provided a network for spreading Socinian books and ideas.
Development that preserves community character, housing that serves a range of income groups, a vital center and improved transportation will lead to a better quality of life for all our citizens.
With almost 200 works by these and others, the National Gallery places Stieglitz at the vital center of the art he championed--the gallerist as visionary.
Without any obvious irony, Aronowitz calls for a "politics of freedom"--by which he means precisely the opposite of what Arthur Schlesinger intended by the phrase when he chose it for the subtitle of The Vital Center.
Instead of the vital center compromises of 1997, they have reprised many of the excesses of 1995.
Nor does it appear that Clinton, who continues slouching ever-farther toward the right in his desire to be viewed as part of "the vital center," would prove an obstacle to "updating" banking laws.
He describes himself as merely having "wobbled slightly around the vital center.