Vioxx


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Related to Vioxx: Celebrex

Vioxx®

Rofecoxib Pain management A COX-2 inhibitor used to manage osteoarthritic pain, acute pain in adults, primary dysmenorrhea.
See COX-2 inhibitor.

Vioxx

A brand name for ROFECOXIB.
References in periodicals archive ?
Merck agreed to settle the Vioxx personal-injury litigation for $4.
They determined that Merck failed to warn physicians about the increased risk of heart attacks; that the company intentionally suppressed, concealed, or omitted risk information from physicians and consumers; that Humeston's doctor would have altered his prescribing decision if he had been adequately warned; and that Vioxx was a substantial contributing factor in Humeston's heart attack.
But when Gilmartin left a year earlier than expected as part of the fallout from the Vioxx lawsuits and criticism from investors, current CEO Richard Clark replaced him.
In September 2004 Merck announced the recall of its arthritis and pain medication Vioxx because a study showed an increased risk of heart attack and stroke.
In the case of Celebrex and Vioxx, both drugs were promoted as being superior to commonly available, and much cheaper, alternatives--such as ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil), naproxen (Aleve), and diclofenac (Voltaren)--because they reduced the likelihood of serious but nonfatal stomach ulcers.
But Merck advertised Vioxx without clear reference to the risks.
He is one of about 150 of the 400,000 UK patients prescribed Vioxx before it was withdrawn last year who are already part of a class action suit against Merck.
Vioxx, an arthritis drug, was withdrawn from circulation at the end of last September after a three-year trial linked it to an increased risk of heart disease events.
But after the massive award in Texas to Carol Ernst - whose husband Robert died from a heart attack while on Vioxx - lawyers expect to be deluged.
Vioxx, an arthritis drug which was prescribed to 400,000 patients in the UK, was taken off the market at the end of last September after a three-year trial linked it to an increased risk of heart disease.
In 2002, as approval times were lengthening, it was "too slow" again; now, with headlines about Vioxx and the others, it's again "too fast.
The first clinical study to hint at a heart attack risk associated with Vioxx was funded by Merck and published in 2000, the year after the drug's approval.