vernacular

(redirected from Vernacular language)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.
Related to Vernacular language: Vernacular architecture, Standard language

vernacular

(vər-năk′yə-lər)
n.
1.
a. The everyday language spoken by a people as distinguished from the literary language.
b. A variety of such everyday language specific to a social group or region: the vernaculars of New York City.
2. The specialized vocabulary of a particular trade, profession, or group: in the legal vernacular.
3. The common, nonscientific name of a plant or animal.
adj.
1. Native to or commonly spoken by the members of a particular country or region.
2. Using the native language of a region, especially as distinct from the literary language: a vernacular poet.
3. Relating to or expressed in the native language or dialect.
4. Of or being an indigenous building style using local materials and traditional methods of construction and ornament, especially as distinguished from academic or historical architectural styles.
5. Occurring or existing in a particular locality; endemic: a vernacular disease.
6. Relating to or designating the common, nonscientific name of a biological species.

ver·nac′u·lar·ly adv.
References in periodicals archive ?
For Ferguson (1959), the distinction between high and low domains forms the basis for the language-political phenomenon of diglossia, where all members of a speech community are socially conditioned bilinguals, having both a vernacular language for low domains, and a distinct standard language for high domains.
Considering the situation of Burushaski, the case study looked at the possibilities to use and choose vernacular language Burushaski for education.
The book is a well-argued case of "creolizationas-versatility," is provocative, and will certainly inspire other scholars to explore further sources in vernacular languages in their respective fields of study.
The author addresses sometimes technical legal issues in a vernacular language that nonspecialists can readily understand.
Written especially for adolescents and teenagers, Alexander The Great Rocks The World chronicles the events of Alexander's life, his military conquests, his ideals of unity, his battle tactics, and much more in detailed yet plain-spoken vernacular language.
The term demotic is a derivative of the word demos, which means "populace," and reveals the unmistakable connection of these songs with the vernacular language as well as the secular musical tradition.
00) tells of the 12th century troubadours who wrote new romances in vernacular language to express and present the image of the feminine.
The poet did not craft the image of the wernurse ex nihilo; indeed, he was not unique in using the metaphor of lactation for the transmission of file vernacular language.
Li Livres dou Tresor is distinguished by Brunetto's clear organization and user-friendly system of textual subdivisions, his panoramic erudition, his straightforward style, and his decision to compose his compendium in a vernacular language rather than in Latin.
Throughout history, Latin pronunciation has developed in accordance to the vernacular language of its users.
Bambara's young narrator/protagonists in these two stories deploy a community-specific, self-confident, passionate, high-energy, vernacular language of resistance, and they celebrate the families and heritage that stand unshakably behind them.
Elman likened them to the European elites of the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries who subordinated their own vernacular language for study in classical Latin.