Urate crystals

Urate crystals

Crystals formed by high levels of uric acid in the blood.
Mentioned in: Gout
References in periodicals archive ?
Left untreated, gout can lead to more severe conditions, including recurrent gout, which can erode and eventually destroy a joint; advanced gout, leading to nodules of urate crystals on fingers, hands, feet, elbows or Achilles tendons; or kidneys tones, which develop from urate crystals collecting in the urinary tract.
The saturation level of urate is 420 [micro]mol/L (regardless of sex) in blood, so greater serum urate values can cause precipitation of urate crystals, thus resulting in their deposition in joint cavities and other tissues.
Only half of the studies confirmed the diagnosis of gout by the presence of monosodium urate crystals within joint spaces.
The uric acid can form urate crystals in your joints, which causes inflammation and pain.
Urate, with joint aspiration to identify urate crystals and culture to exclude septic arthritis.
Gout is a chronic rheumatic disease resulting from accumulation of monosodium urate crystals in tissues.
8 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) of blood, uric acid begins to settle out of the blood and may harden and form sharp urate crystals that are deposited in your joints and other tissues, setting the stage for gout attacks in joints.
Gouty arthritis is an inflammatory disease triggered by the accumulation of monosodium urate crystals in the joints [1].
Compared with the gold standard of monosodium urate crystals in synovial fluid, the ACR rule has a sensitivity of 92% and a specificity of 89%.
Furthermore, DECT showed extensive monosodium urate crystals in the intercarpal and radiocarpal joints with compression overlying the flexor tendons (Figure 1b, c).
This causes uric acid to build up and form needle-like urate crystals in a joint or the surrounding tissue.
CPPD crystals were first identified in 1961 in the synovial fluid of patients with gout-like symptoms without sodium urate crystals, which were described by McCarty as CPDD [4].