buzzword

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buzzword

Vox populi A generic name for a term that has been recently incorporated into the argot of a particular field
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Autism is no longer thought to be a single condition but, rather, an umbrella term for a number of predominately genetic conditions.
Critical care is an umbrella term which is used to describe a whole range of critical specialties, such as emergency care, and coronary care.
The drug will benefit thousands of Merseyside patients, as rates of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) - the umbrella term for the diseases - are very high in the region, mainly due to levels of smoking.
The word "laptop" has evolved into an umbrella term for "portable computer.
Others consider the term "Francophone" to be so tainted by neocolonial overtones that they would prefer to banish it altogether and rework the concept of "French" literature(s) to serve as an umbrella term for all writing in the French language, irrespective of the countries in which it is produced or the national origins of its authors.
Part of UBC Press's Sexuality Studies series, Undercurrents takes pleasure in destabilizing perspectives on both postcolonial Hong Kong and tongzhi (literally "comrade," the irreverent umbrella term adopted by Chinese sexual minorities).
Dizziness is a broad umbrella term whose meaning includes peripheral vestibular symptoms as well as other symptoms, such as fainting, blacking-out spells, headaches, and lightheadedness.
Germany's Bayer and its partner Johnson & Johnson (New Brunswick NJ) will now start a final-stage phase III trial of Xarelto for preventing acute coronary syndrome (ACS)--an umbrella term covering symptoms ranging from severe chest pain to heart attacks--earlier than the previously planned date of second half of 2009.
Art is an umbrella term that encompasses a wide diversity of formats in which men and women work to create items of beauty that range from the simple to the complex and are in an continual state of evolving discovery as new techniques and mediums for artistic expression are developed with each new generation of artists.
While I like the idea of trying to be more inclusive and less "threatening" with an umbrella term like "post-theological," ("The Post-Theological Umbrella," January/February 2008) I wonder if it is a constructive step in the right direction.
The generic umbrella term of "world music" doesn't aptly describe the blend of genres and cultures, and Washington appreciates that audiences can recognize Trinidad, the Congo and gospel music in their songs.