ultracentrifuge

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ultracentrifuge

 [ul″trah-sen´trĭ-fūj]
the centrifuge used in ultracentrifugation.

ul·tra·cen·tri·fuge

(ŭl'tră-sen'tri-fyūj),
A high-speed centrifuge (up to 100,000 rpm) by means of which large molecules, for example, of protein or nucleic acids, are caused to sediment at practicable rates; used for determinations of molecular weights, separation of large molecules, criteria of homogeneity of large molecules, conformational studies, etc.

ultracentrifuge

(ŭl′trə-sĕn′trə-fyo͞oj′)
n.
A high-velocity centrifuge used in the separation of colloidal or submicroscopic particles.

ul′tra·cen·trif′u·gal (-trĭf′yə-gəl, -trĭf′ə-gəl) adj.
ul′tra·cen·trif′u·gal·ly adv.
ul′tra·cen′tri·fu·ga′tion (-fyo͝o-gā′shən) n.

ultracentrifuge

[ul′trəsen′trifyo̅o̅j]
Etymology: L, ultra, beyond; Gk, kentron, center; L, fugere, to flee
a high-speed centrifuge with a rotation rate fast enough to produce sedimentation of protein and viruses, even in blood plasma. Use of an attached microscope may make it possible to see the sediment.

ul·tra·cen·tri·fuge

(ŭl'tră-sen'tri-fyūj)
A high-speed centrifuge by means of which large molecules (e.g., of protein or nucleic acids) are caused to sediment at practicable rates.

ultracentrifuge

A device for rotating small containers at extremely high speed so as to expose the liquid contents to powerful centrifugal force, of the order of 100,000 g. Ultracentrifuges are used to separate particles of molecular size and determine molecular weights.

ultracentrifuge

a machine capable of spinning a rotor at speeds of up to 50 000 revolutions per minute, producing up to 500 000 g forces. The high speeds enable the separation of tiny particles, which are identified by the rate at which they move down the centrifuge tube. The unit of rate is called the Svedberg (S), after the inventor of the ultracentrifuge. Thus RIBOSOMES are found to consist of two subunits after ultracentrifugation, called 30S and 50S. See also DENSITY-GRADIENT CENTRIFUGATION, DIFFERENTIAL CENTRIFUGATION, MICROSOMAL FRACTION.

ul·tra·cen·tri·fuge

(ŭl'tră-sen'tri-fyūzh)
A high-speed centrifuge by means of which large molecules sediment at practicable rates.

ultracentrifuge,

n a high-speed centrifuge with a rotation rate fast enough to produce sedimentation of viruses, even in blood plasma. Many kinds of biochemical analyses use ultracentrifuge, including such analyses as the measurement and separation of some proteins and viruses.

ultracentrifuge

the centrifuge used in ultracentrifugation.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ultracentrifuges are offered as stand-alone and bench-top units.
The majority of demand for ultracentrifuges stems from the public sector, however, interest by the pharmaceutical and biotech industries and the accuracy of ultracentrifuges has positively impacted the sales of ultracentrifuges despite the instrument's mature state of technology.
Other methods to attain such information are cheaper and easier, such as polyacrylamide gel electrophoesis and gel permeation chromatography, but the ultracentrifuge provides more accurate results.
Precooled rotors were ultracentrifuged in either a Beckman L7-55 or a L8-55 ultracentrifuge that had been precooled to 10[degrees]C.
23 mL of saline, as appropriate, into the correct-sized ultracentrifuge tube, slicing the tube, and then measuring the volume of saline in the top fraction using gravimetrically calibrated pipettes.
Factors that increased specimen throughput were (a) use of a gravimetrically calibrated manual pipette for the introduction of specimen into the ultracentrifuge tube; (b) use of open-top ultracentrifuge tubes that do not require sealing before ultracentrifugation; (c) use of a calibrated CentriTube Slicer; (d) use of a set of dedicated, preset, and gravimetrically calibrated manual pipettes for the reconstitution of the top and bottom fractions; and (e) placement of reconstituted fractions directly into analyzer-ready tubes or cups rather than volumetric flasks.
Beckman Coulter's Optima XLA and XL-1 Series of ultracentrifuges are among the most widely used models of AUs.
The study of macromolecules by biotech and biopharmaceutical researchers, however, has renewed interest in ultracentrifuges.
Table 60: World Historic Review for Ultracentrifuges by
Centrifuges), and Ultracentrifuges Markets for Years 2003,
Table 61: World 15-Year Perspective for Ultracentrifuges byGeographic Region - Percentage Breakdown of Dollar Sales forUS, Canada, Japan, Europe, Asia-Pacific (excluding Japan),Middle East, and Latin America Markets for Years 2003, 2011 &2017 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) II-104III.
Table 63: US Historic Review for Laboratory Centrifuges byProduct Segment-Bench-Top Centrifuges, Floor Centrifuges,Micro Centrifuges, Specialty Centrifuges (Cell-WashingCentrifuges, Hematocrit Centrifuges, and CytologicalCentrifuges), and Ultracentrifuges Markets IndependentlyAnalyzed with Annual Sales Figures in Units for Years 2003through 2008 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) III-3