bug

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bug

(bŭg),
An insect belonging to the suborder Heteroptera. For organisms so called, see the specific term.

bug

(bŭg)
n.
1.
a. An insect having mouthparts used for piercing and sucking, such as an aphid, a bedbug, or a stinkbug.
b. An insect of any kind, such as a cockroach or a ladybug.
c. A small invertebrate with many legs, such as a spider or a centipede.
2.
a. A disease-producing microorganism or agent: a flu bug.
b. The illness or disease so produced: took several days to get over the bug.

bug′ger n.

bug

an error in a computer program (software bug) or a design flaw in computer hardware (hardware bug), usually resulting in an inability to process data correctly.
Computers Any defect in a system, usually understood as a software problem
Drug slang See Coke bug
Entomology Any of a number of insects that suck blood—e.g., bed bugs (Cimex lectularius)—and/or act as vectors for disease—e.g., reduviid bugs, carriers of trypanosomiasis
Informatics A tool used by hackers to access all the cookies from other websites stored on a PC’s hard drive
Microbiology A popular synonym for bacteria

bug

Medical entomology Any of a number of insects that are bloodsucking–eg, bed bugs–Cimex lectularius and/or act as vectors for disease–eg, reduviid bugs, carriers of trypanosomiasis. See Assassin bug, Kissing bug, Red bug, Reduviid bug Microbiology A popular synonym for bacteria. See Superbug.

bug

(bŭg)
1. Any insect of the order Hemiptera.
2. More colloquially, any insect or arachnid.
3. (slang) An acute febrile illness such as influenza or the common cold.
[of uncertain origin]

bug

One of various wingless or four-winged insects of the order Hemiptera and especially of the suborder Heteroptera , with piercing and sucking mouth parts. The bugs of medical importance include the cone nose (Reduviid) ‘assassin’ or ‘kissing’ bugs which transmit CHAGAS' DISEASE, and the bed bug, Cimex lectularis , which cause painful bites.

bug

(bŭg)
1. Any insect of the order Hemiptera.
2. More colloquially, any insect or arachnid.
3. (slang) An acute febrile illness such as influenza or the common cold.
[of uncertain origin]

bug

a member of the family Cimicidae in the order Hemiptera and includes the blood-sucking bugs. See haematosiphon and oeciacus vicarius.

Patient discussion about bug

Q. i don't like bugs! actually , i afraid of them . is it a phobia? do i need to see someone to discuss it?

A. Phobia or the excess fear of an ordinary object is indeed considered a disorder. However, as many other psychiatric disorders, as long as it doesn’t affect your life adversely and you are capable of functioning well in your daily life you don't HAVE to treat it (unless you want to).

More discussions about bug
References in periodicals archive ?
There are also predatory true bugs, which find live animals and feed on them.
167-248 in Catalog of the Heteroptera, or true bugs, of Canada and the Continental United States (T.
With no great thoughts of where it would all end up, we set out in the spring of 1995 on a most excellent true bug adventure.
They published in 1999 an article in English titled, "Diversity of seasonal adaptations in terrestrial true bugs (Heteroptera) from the temperate zone", which is a review of known literature including that derived from their own independent research.
Randall Toby Schuh for his outstanding contributions to the knowledge of the true bugs, and for his inestimable contributions to the Miridae and Leptopodidae of the world.
2002; Darsie 2003; Darsie & Shroyer 2004), copepods (Reid & Hribar 2006), a biting midge (Grogan & Hribar 2006), and true bugs (Henry & Froeschner 1993; Henry & Brambila 2003; Henry 2003; Dobbs & Brambila 2004).
Heteroptera or true bugs of Canada and the Continental United States.
Toby, an outstanding heteropterologist, has not only contributed greatly to the knowledge of true bugs, he has also contributed to the training of young entomologists.
I would also like to thank Toby Schuh, who gave me the opportunity to pursue a career studying the true bugs.
Jim's real love was the true bugs (Heteroptera), but he also had an ongoing fascination with snakes and was a serious student of ornithology, a life-long bird watcher, and, at one time, the Connecticut State Ornithologist.