Trombicula


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Related to Trombicula: chigger, Trombicula alfreddugesi

Trombicula

 [trom-bik´u-lah]
a genus of mites of the family Trombiculidae, including T. akamu´shi, T. delien´sis, T. flet´cheri, T. pal´lida, and T. scutella´ris; their larvae (chiggers) are vectors of Rickettsia tsutsugamushi, the cause of scrub typhus.

Trombicula

(trom-bik'yū-lă),
The chigger mite, a genus of mites (family Trombiculidae) the larvae of which (chiggers, red bugs) include pests of humans and other animals, and vectors of rickettsial diseases.

Trombicula

/Trom·bic·u·la/ (trom-bik´u-lah) a genus of acarine mites (family Trombiculidae), including T. akamu´shi, T. delien´sis, T. fletch´eri, T. interme´dia, T. pal´lida, and T. scutella´ris, whose larvae (chiggers) are vectors of Rickettsia tsutsugamushi, the cause of scrub typhus.

Trom·bic·u·la

(trom-bik'yū-lă)
The chigger mite, a genus of mites the larvae of which (chiggers, red bugs) include pests of humans and other animals, and vectors of rickettsial and, probably, viral diseases.

Trombicula

a genus of mites (family Trombiculidae), whose larvae are parasitic on all animal species and cause dermatitis. Some also transmit diseases from their natural hosts rodents to humans, e.g. scrub typhus. The larvae are also called chiggers.

Trombicula akamushi
transmits scrub typhus of humans.
Trombicula alfreddugesi
see eutrombiculaalfreddugesi.
Trombicula autumnalis
distinctively red mite found on all domestic animal species including poultry. Attacks humans. It causes dermatitis, e.g. between dog's claws and on the heels of horses. Called also harvest mite, aoutat, lepte automnale.
Trombicula batatas
causes dermatitis.
Trombicula delhiensis
transmits scrub typhus of humans from rodents.
Trombicula minor
the scrub-itch mite.
Trombicula sarcina
see eutrombiculasarcina.
Trombicula spendens
causes dermatitis.
References in periodicals archive ?
Although recognition was not immediate because the mite was traumatized, with its head detached and lateralized, it was still possible to identify six legs and larval stage features of Trombicula autumnalis (Fig.
In fact, one of Evenhuis' colleagues, Lee Golf, had just had a paper rejected by the JOURNAL OF MEDICAL ENTOMOLOGY because he proposed naming a new chigger Trombicula tgifi.
Audy, a British Army physician during the war, reported that rats were numerous in the area and Trombicula (now Leptotromhidium) deliense were found in a variety of habitats (1).