meat glue

(redirected from Transglutiminase)

meat glue

Any of a family of enzymes (EC 2.3.2.12), obtained from Streptoverticillium mobaraense fermentation or extracted from animal blood, which digest skeletal muscle, allowing thin strips of animal meat to be fused together as “reformed” meat, creating thickened “steaks” from scraps. Meat glue is used in the restaurant industry to maximise the value of lesser grades of meat. The public health disadvantage is that bacteria may colonise at the interface and/or become incorporated in the meat and, for customers who like undercooked meat, pose a risk of infection.

meat glue

A colloquial term for “transglutaminase.”
See: transglutaminase
References in periodicals archive ?
Some of the dishes that Wickens copied were: sliced poached squab served in a beaker with two burning cinnamon sticks; smoked yogurt that tasted like bacon; and pureed prawns bound with transglutiminase pushed through a die to make noodles.
There is no mention of tissue transglutiminase antibodies or indeed, the possibility of pre-digesting gluten or genetically modifying wheat.