trans fat

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trans fat

(trăns)
n.
1. A trans fatty acid.
2. Trans fatty acids considered as a group.

trans fat

An unsaturated fat containing a trans—i.e., the carbon moieties on the two sides of the double bond point in opposite directions—(E)- isomer. Trans fats (TFs) are not found in nature; minimal TFs are present in animal fats. TFs are abundant in margarines, frying fats and shortenings, and are formed when polyunsaturated fat-rich vegetable and marine oils and vegetable shortenings are “hardened” by partial hydrogenation, producing fats with a firmness and consistency desired by both food manufacturers and consumers. The most abundant TF is elaidic acid and its isomers, which are 18-carbon molecules with one double bond.

TFs comprise 6 to 8% of the daily per capita consumption of fat in developed nations; health experts recommend reduction of TFs to trace amounts, as increased dietary TFs result in increased total and LDL-cholesterol, reduced HDL-cholesterol and an increased risk of coronary artery disease.

trans fat

A fat derived from the partial hydrogenation of vegetable oils. Examples include vegetable shortening and margarine. Studies have associated trans-fat consumption with an increased risk for coronary artery disease.
See also: fat
References in periodicals archive ?
At the moment, there is no legal requirement to remove trans fats from foods.
But trans fats were found to increase early deaths by 34%.
Trans fats have no health benefits and pose a significant risk for heart disease, but the case for saturated fat is less clear," said de Souza.
So if you've ever experienced a craving for such delicious junk-food delicacies as donuts, frozen pizza, coffee creamers, orcanned cinnamon rolls, or fast-food fare like the Wendy's Baconator or Domino's extra-thick pan pizzas, get ready for a mouthful of disappointment: They are all products that currently rely heavily on trans fats.
This means that by 2018, we might find food products in supermarket aisles that may be free of trans fats.
Based on a review of scientific evidence, FDA has finalized its determination that partially hydrogenated oils (PHOs), the primary dietary source of artificial trans fat in processed foods, are not Generally Recognized As Safe (GRAS) for use in human food.
Trans fats were on the way out even before the FDA acted.
Katherine Patton, RD, clinical dietitian with Preventive Cardiology at Cleveland Clinic, believes trans fats are on their way out.
A Trans fats were initially seen as a healthier alternative to saturated fats.
Trans fats are unsaturated fats that are uncommon in nature, but can be created artificially.
Indeed, fats such as trans fats remain dietary villains because of their deleterious effects on cardiovascular health.