trademark

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trademark

a word, symbol, or device assigned to a product by its manufacturer, registered or not registered, as a part of its identity. See also generic name.

trademark,

n a word, symbol, or device assigned to a product by its manufacturer, possibly registered, as a part of its identity.
References in periodicals archive ?
The UK Intellectual Property Office would like to invite you to the Exploring Trade Marks in China, India, Turkey and South Africa event in London.
com/research/37jmlq/annual_conference) has announced the addition of the "Annual Conference for Senior Trade Mark & Design Administrators (London, UK - September 24-25, 2015)" conference to their offering.
A FIRM of patent and trade mark attourneys in Liverpool is backing 11-year-old schoolgirl Angel Thomas - one of the UK's youngest entrepreneurs.
As you plan to use your logo in relation to your business, I recommend that you protect the logo as a registered trade mark and/or as a registered design.
Both where a business is based and the geographical scope of its customer base will impact on the jurisdictions in which its trade marks and what trade marks should be protected.
What are the issues that trade mark owners face with the new gTLDs?
Over the passage of time, certain words which may have caused major offence in earlier times would now be acceptable as trade marks in certain markets, namely, the Australian market," White told News.
Such a finding would be likely to eliminate the protection which national trade marks are intended to provide.
A smAll Northern Ireland company has come out on top in a dispute with a leading UK retailer over a trade mark.
Rhondda Cynon Taf trading standards department seized the items, which were submitted for examination by Trade Marks Holders representatives and all, except a Diesel polo shirt, were deemed to be unauthorised counterfeit copies.
Most recently, on 12 May 2010, OHIM (the court that rules on trade marks that have EU-wide effect) ruled that botox was not generic as it maintained a high degree of distinctiveness through its use in "pharmaceutical preparations for the treatment of wrinkles.
TRADE marks are signs, symbols, logos, words, sounds or music (such as jingles) that distinguish your products and services from those of your competitors.