hepatotoxicity

(redirected from Toxic liver disease)
Also found in: Dictionary.
Related to Toxic liver disease: toxic hepatitis

hep·a·to·tox·ic·i·ty

(hep'ă-tō-tok-sis'i-tē),
The capacity of a drug, chemical, or other exposure to produce injury to the liver. Agents with recognized hepatotoxicity include carbon tetrachloride, alcohol, dantrolene sodium, valproic acid, and isonicotinic acid hydrazide.

hepatotoxicity

(hĕp′ə-tō-tŏk-sĭs′ĭ-tē, hĭ-păt′ō-)
n.
1. The quality or condition of being toxic or destructive to the liver.
2. The capacity of a substance to have damaging effects on the liver.

hep′a·to·tox′ic (-tŏk′sĭk) adj.

hepatotoxicity

[hep′ətōtoksis′itē]
Etymology: Gk, hēpar + toxikon, poison
the tendency of an agent, usually a drug or alcohol, to have a destructive effect on the liver.

hep·a·to·tox·ic·i·ty

(hep'ă-tō-tok-sis'i-tē)
The capacity of a drug, chemical, or other exposure to produce injury to the liver.

hepatotoxicity

The state of being poisonous (toxic) to the liver, or the degree to which a substance is toxic to the liver.

hepatotoxicity (hepˑ··tō·tkˈ·si·sit·ē),

n liver toxicity.

hep·a·to·tox·ic·i·ty

(hep'ă-tō-tok-sis'i-tē)
Capacity of a drug, chemical, or other exposure to injure the liver.
References in periodicals archive ?
The German regulatory authority BfArM came to the conclusion that in 19 patients (Table 1) there may be an association between kava treatment and the development of toxic liver disease, and the causality was defined to be either possible (n = 3), possible/probable (n = 2), probable (n = 12) or very probable (n = 2) (BfArM, 2002).