tourniquet

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tourniquet

 [toor´nĭ-ket]
a device for compression of an artery or vein; uses include stopping of the excessive bleeding of a hemorrhage, maintenance of a nearly bloodless operative field, prevention of spread of snake venom after a snakebite, and aiding in obtaining blood samples or giving intravenous injections.



For hemorrhage, a tourniquet should be used only as a last resort, when the bleeding is so severe that it is threatening the life of the injured person and cannot be stopped by direct pressure. In the case of snakebite, a moderately tight tourniquet may be applied to impede the spread of venom while not stopping arterial blood flow. For an intravenous injection, a loosely applied tourniquet inhibits blood flow in the superficial veins, making them more prominent so that a vein can be found for the injection. For maintenance of a nearly bloodless operative field, pneumatic tourniquets are often used. The American Association of Operating Room Nurses (AORN) has published guidelines for the use of tourniquets during surgery; see their web site at http://www.aorn.org.
To apply a tourniquet for control of arterial bleeding from the arm: Wrap a gauze pad twice with a strip of cloth just below the armpit and tie with a half knot; tie a stick at the knot with a square knot. Slowly twist stick to tighten.
tourniquet test one involving the application of a tourniquet to a limb, as in determination of capillary fragility (denoted by the appearance of petechiae) or of the status of the collateral circulation.

tour·ni·quet

(tūr'ni-ket),
An instrument for temporarily arresting the flow of blood to or from a distal part by pressure applied with an encircling device.
[Fr. fr. tourner, to turn]

tourniquet

/tour·ni·quet/ (toor´nĭ-ket) a band to be drawn tightly around a limb for the temporary arrest of circulation in the distal area.

tourniquet

(to͝or′nĭ-kĭt, tûr′-)
n.
A device, typically a tightly encircling bandage, used to check bleeding by temporarily stopping the flow of blood through a large artery in a limb.

tourniquet

[tur′nikit, too͡r′-]
Etymology: Fr, turnstile
a device used in controlling hemorrhage, consisting of a wide constricting band applied to the limb close to the site of bleeding. The use of a tourniquet is a drastic measure and is to be used only if the hemorrhage is life-threatening and if other safer measures have proved ineffective. A tourniquet is also used routinely to distend veins before venipuncture. See also hemorrhage.
enlarge picture
Application of a tourniquet to control hemorrhage

tourniquet

A cord or constrictive band used to ↓ blood flow to 1+ extremity; tourniquets have clinical currency in ↓ the centripetal flow of toxins in snake and scorpion bites, and in ↓ the cardiac load in acute CHF, as may occur in an acute MI, where the tourniquets are rotated, simultaneously with other emergency measures–eg, O2, lasix, nitroprusside, nitroglycerin; when used, a tourniquet should be confined to the proximal part of the extremity. See Rotating tourniquet.

tour·ni·quet

(tŭr'ni-kĕt)
An instrument for temporarily arresting the flow of blood to or from a distal part by pressure applied with an encircling device.
[Fr. fr. tourner, to turn]

tourniquet

An encircling band placed around a limb and tightened enough to compress blood vessels and prevent blood flow. Tourniquets are used in surgery or in the emergency control of severe bleeding from an artery or a large vein, but are dangerous if left in place for more than an hour or so. A forgotten tourniquet inevitably causes GANGRENE and loss of the limb beyond the point of application.

Tourniquet

A device used to control bleeding, consisting of a constricting band applied tightly around a limb above the wound. It should only be used if the bleeding in life-threatening and can not be controlled by other means.
Mentioned in: Phlebotomy, Wounds

tourniquet

tight, encircling band applied to a limb/digit to reduce distal blood flow/create a bloodless field (see Esmarch bandage)

tourniquet (turˑ·ni·kit),

n device used to control hemorrhage by occluding the artery proximal to the area of bleeding. It should only be used in drastic situations when the injury is considered life-threatening and other treatments are deemed ineffective. It is also used to dilate veins before venipuncture.
Enlarge picture
Tourniquet.

tour·ni·quet

(tŭr'ni-kĕt)
An instrument for temporarily arresting the flow of blood to or from a distal part by pressure applied with an encircling device.
[Fr. fr. tourner, to turn]

tourniquet (tur´nikit),

n a device used in controlling hemorrhage, consisting of a wide constricting band applied to the limb proximal to the site of bleeding.

tourniquet

a device for compression of an artery or vein, most commonly used in companion animals to facilitate obtaining blood samples or giving intravenous injections.

Rumel tourniquet
one constructed of ligature doubled back through a tube, with the exposed loop used to temporarily occlude large vascular structures.
References in periodicals archive ?
The question of safety is relevant in the case of the Bier block, especially with regard to use of the pneumatic pressure tourniquet, and the use of high dose lidocaine (1.
Tourniquets gain new respect after recent tragedies.
baumannii contamination rates on reusable tourniquets used in outpatient and inpatient settings in a Department of Defense tertiary care hospital.
The mothers bravely decide it is easier to dismantle the prams and carry them over the tourniquets, down the stairs to the platform.
The new tourniquet system however, has been created to maximize efficiency, he said.
The study did tests on all 50 tourniquets used at ARI and found some had the potentially fatal MRSA superbug.
Dublin District Court heard DSPCA inspector Liam Kinsella found two pups with tourniquets on their tails, known as "docking", which withers it and causes it to fall off.
While many physicians have been taught that tourniquets should never be used because they can lead to the loss of a limb, Dr.
Working on the same principles as all tourniquets, "(The SOFTT) is used to stop the bleeding from an extremity and to prevent shock," said Staff Sergeant Thomas J.
Some told how they had seen him use shoelaces, belts and a tie as tourniquets to bring his veins up.
Now tourniquets are not that expensive, indeed certain drug companies supply them for free.