intentional infliction of emotional distress

(redirected from Tort of outrage)
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intentional infliction of emotional distress

adjective Referring to a civil action against a person who allegedly said or did something so outrageous or insulting to the plaintiff that he or she suffered subsequent emotional damage.

intentional infliction of emotional distress

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IIED

Deliberate destruction of a person's peace of mind; a common law tort. The conduct must be outrageous and beyond all bounds of decency; ordinary rude or insulting behavior is not enough. In those rare cases in which a health care provider inflicts intentional distress on a patient, he or she may be held liable for damages in a court of law.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The Childers sued for medical malpractice and the tort of outrage.
28) In instances where non-target annoyances are impacted by annoyancetech devices (collateral damage so to speak), transferred-intent would likely lead to liability of intentional torts (with the exception of the tort of outrage which does not transfer).
The court noted that even if a juvenile detainee had serious mental health problems before an employee allegedly inserted his finger into her vagina, that fact would not preclude a finding that any mental distress she experienced was caused by the employee, for the purposes of the Alabama tort of outrage.
With this cause of action, commonly referred to in South Carolina as the tort of outrage, the plaintiff must show that the defendant's conduct was so extreme and outrageous that it caused severe emotional distress.
The tort of outrage is defined under Alabama law as "behavior so outrageous in character and extreme in degree as to go beyond all possible bounds of decency so as to be regarded as atrocious and utterly intolerable in civilized society.
Crutcher for medical negligence and the tort of outrage and claims against the hospital for medical negligence, the tort of outrage, negligence, and negligent hiring.