Barber

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Bar·ber

(bar'bĕr),
Glenn, 20th-century U.S. orthopedic surgeon. See: Blount-Barber disease.
A professional who cuts (usually male) hair and shaves or trims facial hair
References in periodicals archive ?
Among the most pressing issues is the need for a cost-cost assessment, Tonsor said.
Bernard and Bernard 2009; Olynk, Tonsor, and Wolf 2010).
Without introductory pleasantries and no dramatic flair, Tonsor began the day's lecture, reading from a hand-written text.
I would like to thank Brian Charlesworth, Deborah Charlesworth, Jan van Groenendael, Susan Kalisz, Matthew Leibold, Tom Nagylaki, Steve Tonsor, and Michael Wade.
To support this point one need only mention a few names from that period, for example, Mel Bradford, Francis Canavan, Whittaker Chambers, Gottfried Dietze, John Hallowell, Will Herberg, Milton Hindus, Friedrich von Hayek, Erik von Kuehnelt-Leddihn, Russell Kirk, John Lukacs, Thomas Molnar, Gerhart Niemeyer, Robert Nisbet, Wilhelm Ropke, Peter Stanlis, Stephen Tonsor, Peter Viereck, Eric Voegelin, Eliseo Vivas, Richard Weaver, and Francis Graham Wilson--a selective list that is merely suggestive of the intellectual resources of the earlier conservatism.
1990; Phillips 1993; Moore and Tonsor 1993; Goodnight 1995), they have nevertheless been adopted as fundamental heuristics for describing the evolutionary process (Provine 1986, p.
1987; Tonsor 1989), and tadpoles of at least three frog species grow faster or larger when reared with kin as opposed to nonkin (Jasienski 1988; Smith 1990; Waldman 1991).
While a few recent studies have begun to empirically demonstrate the ecological and evolutionary importance of seed banks (Kalisz and McPeek 1992, McGraw 1993, Tonsor et al.
Tonsor remarked regarding the neo-cons that "It is splendid when the town whore gets religion and joins the church.
It is an interesting fact that for the past 30 years Michigan has been, if sometimes for only a short time, the home of many major conservative figures: Henry Regnery, Gleaves Whitney, Bruce Frohnen, Tracy Lee Simmons, Stephen Tonsor, Edward Ericson, and Joseph Pearce, to name a very few--not to mention Russell and Annette Kirk.
Tonsor have found Acton to be an attractive figure worthy of study and praise.