Tick-borne disease

(redirected from Tick-borne diseases)
Also found in: Acronyms.

Tick-borne disease

A disease that is spread to animals by the bite of an infected tick.
Mentioned in: Ehrlichiosis
References in periodicals archive ?
It takes several weeks for most tick-borne diseases to be detectable on blood tests, so there is no need to rush to the vet unless your dog starts to show clinical signs of illness.
Tick-borne diseases and poverty: the impact of ticks and tick-borne diseases on the livelihoods of small-scale and marginal livestock owners in India and eastern and southern Africa.
In times like these, it is imperative that we do all that we can to halt the continued spread of these tick-borne diseases.
Abstract--Rocky Mountain spotted fever is a tick-borne disease caused by the bacterial pathogen Rickettsia rickettsii (Brumpt).
In terms of global spread, the World Health Organization (WHO) states that Lyme disease "is now the most common tick-borne disease in the Northern Hemisphere.
Hamer and her team will continue studying native Texas wildlife such as rodents, raccoons and possums for tick-borne diseases and look for small populations of the exotic ticks to try to determine whether they can adapt to their new environment.
Formed in 2014, the Central Mass Lyme Foundation's mission is to help raise awareness, educate, teach prevention and provide support to anyone wanting more information about Lyme and other tick-borne disease illnesses.
A range of contributors offer a wide spread of topics, from the bush-meat trade in Africa to tick-borne diseases to global travel to new or reemerging viral diseases as a result of a warmer climate, human changes to the environment, or new systems of human behavior.
Meryl Littman, VMD, ACVIM, Professor of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine, whose research interests include canine tick-borne diseases, concurs: "Lyme disease in cats is not well-documented.
The reason why we are seeing a growing incidence of tick-borne diseases is complex while at the same time simply a reflection of the changes in our land use, along with the reemergence of the deer tick and return of the white-tailed deer.