Malthus, Thomas Robert

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Malthus, Thomas Robert

(1766–1834) English political economist whose ideas on population growth influenced the evolutionary theory propagated by Charles DARWIN and Alfred WALLACE. His most interesting observation was that, if unchecked, the human population would grow geometrically whilst the food supply would grow only arithmetically, thus giving rise to mass starvation. He considered that the only checks on population growth were disease, war, famine and abstinence from sex, the latter being the most reliable method of BIRTH CONTROL at the time.
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Thomas Malthus, an English priest and economist, postulated toward the end of the 18th century that the world's population would outstrip its ability to grow food by the mid-19th century.
Discussions about benevolence, charity, and welfare in Dickens's time were conducted in the shadow of the great political economist Thomas Malthus, whose 1798 Essay on the Principle of Population and its subsequent revisions and reissues were read, not entirely correctly, as arguing for the futility of all large schemes of social improvement.
The endless efforts of the scientists geared towards discoveries has led to a green revolution in the field of agriculture and have done enough to untrue the earlier predictions of mass famine by Thomas Malthus.
Other topics include Robert Thomas Malthus, William Thompson and Thomas Hodgkin on the political economy of the poor, Karl Marx, Thorsten Veblen, John Maynard Keynes' neoclassical ideology and the myth of the self-adjusting market, and the bifurcation of orthodoxy in contemporary economics.
Thomas Malthus (1766-1834) warned that without the practice of "moral restraint" the population tends to increase at a greater rate than its means of subsistence, resulting in the population checks of war, famine and epidemic.
In the late 18th century, Thomas Malthus famously warned that unchecked population growth would inevitably outstrip food production, leaving society destitute.
The shadows of Thomas Malthus and David Ricardo loom large over Turchin and Nefedov's search for history's motive force.
Political economist Thomas Malthus theorised that population growth is stemmed by famine, disease and natural disasters.
Firstly, it is based on hysteria rather than facts, and it is as wrongheaded as Thomas Malthus himself was when he claimed in the 1790s that food production wouldn't be able to keep pace with poor people's rampant breeding and therefore tens of thousands of people would starve to death.
It's very much in keeping with her legacy that our cover story not only takes on the taboo of population, but works in references to tortoiseshell condoms and the sex life of the Reverend Thomas Malthus.
Their high salaries put their British colleagues' noses out of joint, including that of one Thomas Malthus.
Raven offers an interesting but brief history of overpopulation--one of the precursors of man-made disasters--and includes a succinct discussion about Thomas Malthus the English economist and demographer.