atmosphere

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atmosphere

 [at´mos-fēr]
1. the entire gaseous envelope surrounding the earth and subject to the earth's gravitational field.
2. the air or climate in a particular place. adj., atmospher´ic.
3. a unit of pressure, being that exerted by the earth's atmosphere at sea level; equal to 1.01325 × 105pascals (approximately 760 mm Hg). Abbreviated atm.

at·mos·phere

(at'mŏs-fēr),
1. Any gas surrounding a given body; a gaseous medium.
See also: standard atmosphere, torr.
2. A unit of air pressure equal to 101.325 kPa.
See also: standard atmosphere, torr.
[atmo- + G. sphaira, sphere]

atmosphere

/at·mos·phere/ (at´mos-fēr)
1. the entire gaseous envelope surrounding the earth and subject to the earth's gravitational field.
2. the air or climate in a particular place.
3. a unit of pressure, being that exerted by the earth's atmosphere at sea level; equal to 1.01325 × 105pascals (approximately 760 mm Hg). Abbreviated atm.

atmosphere (atm)

[at′məsfir]
Etymology: Gk. atmos, vapor, sphaira, sphere
1 the natural body of air covers the surface of the earth. It is composed of approximately 20% oxygen, 78% nitrogen, and 1% argon and other gases, including small amounts of carbon dioxide hydrogen, and ozone as well as traces of helium, krypton, neon, and xenon and varying amounts of water vapor.
2 an envelope of gas, which may or may not duplicate the natural atmosphere in chemical components.
3 a unit of gas pressure that is usually defined as being equivalent to the average pressure of the earth's atmosphere at sea level, or about 14.7 pounds per square inch or 760 mm Hg. atmospheric, adj.

at·mos·phere

(at'mŏs-fēr)
1. Any gas surrounding a given body; a gaseous medium.
2. A unit of air pressure equal to 101.325 kPa.
See also: standard atmosphere
[atmo- + G. sphaira, sphere]

atmosphere

the gaseous envelope surrounding a particular body such as the earth, or the gaseous content of a given structure or container.

Atmosphere

A measurement of pressure. One atmosphere equals the pressure of air at sea level (14.7 pounds per square inch [psi]).

atmosphere (atm),

n the natural body of air, composed of approximately 20% oxygen, 78% nitrogen, and 2% carbon dioxide and other gases.
References in periodicals archive ?
The sinking ionosphere shouldn't harm life on Earth, says Jarvis, and the ionosphere could bounce back up if humans stop pumping greenhouse gases into the atmosphere.
Slogging through the atmosphere is like trying to throw a rock underwater," says aeronautical engineer Preston Carter, who developed HyperSoar.
By opening up the source code and protocol of the Atmosphere Community Server, developers will be able to create more dynamic and community-enabled 3D worlds on the Web, such as online art galleries and museums, automobile showrooms and space exploration.
Methyl bromide lasts just a few months in the atmosphere before it breaks down, but bromine and other byproducts continue to waft upward and, after a few years, reach the stratospheric ozone layer, says Mike Newchurch of the University of Alabama in Huntsville.
2 Naturally occurring carbon dioxide and water vapor in the air keep more than 80 percent of the heat circulating in the atmosphere.
This chromatograph recorded a 30 percent jump in methane over that measured in the atmosphere.
encountered no solid objects as it streaked 372 miles across the atmosphere on entry and then settled into a 96-mile descent.
IMAGE has provided us with the first global maps of helium ions surrounding the Earth, the first images of the ring current, the first global images of the protons that bombard the atmosphere, and the first radar maps of ion and electron densities throughout the magnetosphere.
It has a heat-trapping potential 25,000 times greater than carbon dioxide--and is increasing in the atmosphere at a rate of 8 percent each year.
It includes Atmosphere Builder, the 3-D world authoring tool; Atmosphere Player, the Web browser plug-in; and the Atmosphere Community Server, which enables real time interaction with other users in a shared 3-D Web environment.
The chemicals may even rain out of the atmosphere to form hydrocarbon ponds or vast lakes on the moon's surface.
Made up of three atoms of oxygen, ozone floats in the atmosphere and blocks the sun's harmful ultraviolet (UV) rays from striking Earth.