Nostradamus

(redirected from The Prophecies)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to The Prophecies: Nostradamus

Nostradamus

(nŏs′trə-dā′məs, -dä′-, nō′strə-) Originally Michel de Notredame. 1503-1566.
French physician and astrologer noted for his several volumes of cryptic prophecies in verse.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Laato's resolution appears to be the most faithful to the prophecies in Samuel and Kings, but we are left with the problem of history: With the exile of Zedekiah, Davidic kingship ended over the Southern Kingdom, as well.
13) Such an understanding of timing is somewhat surprising for the reader, given the prophecies of Jesus where he repeats how the "Son of Man" will return to the earth (9:26, 17:24, 30, 18:8, 21:27-28).
Since the prophecies can't be explained in naturalistic terms, it must be the case that God is the explanation.
The prophecies are the canonical three, modeled on the three Augustan prophecies of the Aeneid: veltro (Inf.
Furthermore the prophecies of 40-55 undoubtedly presuppose familiarity with the contents of much that is to be found in chapters 1-12, not simply as a matter of word-usage and style, but as a clearly recognisable allusion to central themes.
Given that the supposed evidence for the prophecies is false, it is reasonable to say that the prophecies built upon them are false prophecy, even if by chance one or more of them might come about.
On the other hand, many who do not believe in the authenticity of the Bible as the Word of God think everything in the Bible is a myth and fiction - including the prophecies in the Holy Bible about Israel and the Israelites.
In four short chapters, Joel alludes to the prophecies of several of his colleagues, as when he reverses Isaiah's words in the vision of the end of days about beating swords into ploughshares (Isa.
Two key aspects of the play's complexity, the respectful treatment of the Roman conquerors of Spain and the prophecies of a phoenix-like rebirth of Christian Spain from the ashes of the Roman empire, are addressed in de Armas' reading of Numancia as tragedy in his chapter on Aeschylus.
The reason for my newfound comfort is that I no longer read the prophecies of Isaiah as literally as I used to.

Full browser ?