Kinsey reports

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Kinsey reports

The first large-scale studies of human sexual behaviour. The reports, Sexual Behavior in the Human Male (1948) by Alfred C. Kinsey, Wardell B. Pomeroy and Clyde E. Martin, and Sexual Behavior in the Human Female (1953) by the same authors and Paul H. Gebhard, had a profound effect on public and private attitudes to sex and helped to overcome repressive taboos about open discussion on the subject.
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Reumann demonstrates that the Kinsey Reports re-shaped American sexual consciousness by bringing new terms and ideas into the public debate.
In Ernst's 1948 book American Sexual Behavior and the Kinsey Report, Kinsey colleague Robert Dickinson claimed that "virtually every page of the Kinsey Report touches on some section of the legal code .
We might have a group of fifty people, and we would always talk about an issue out of chapter 5 of the Kinsey report.
Mencken said when the Kinsey Report came out in 1948: It just confirmed what he had always suspected, that everybody lies about his sex life.
The Kinsey report blew the lid off the container in which sexual experience had been sealed.
Then, in 1948 and 1952, came the Kinsey Report in the USA which gave the impression that deviant sexual acts were normal, commonplace and acceptable.
As the psychiatrist Karl Menninger said, pooh-poohing the Kinsey report, Women pay me to listen to their sexual confessions, and even then they can't tell me the truth.
A disappointment, which is to say pretty much what you'd expect: the Kinsey Report and dog-eared copies of such novels as Peyton Place, Forever Amber, and King's Row.
Focusing primarily on the last twenty years of sexual history (but covering topics as diverse as psychoanalysis, the Kinsey Report, and the bonobo chimps), The End of Gay provides a critical overview of identity-centered gay and lesbian (and queer) scholarship and culture.
Fifty years ago, in the Kinsey report, 60 per cent of men - contrasted with 30 per cent of women - admitted to being unfaithful to their spouses before the age of 40.