superficial temporal artery

(redirected from Temporal arteries)

su·per·fi·cial tem·po·ral ar·ter·y

[TA]
origin, a terminal branch of the external carotid (with maxillary artery); branches, transverse facial, middle temporal, orbital, parotid, anterior auricular, frontal, and parietal.

superficial temporal artery

an artery at each side of the head that can be easily felt in front of the ear and is often used for taking the pulse. It is the smaller of the two terminal branches of the external carotid. Compare deep temporal artery, middle temporal artery.

su·per·fi·cial tem·po·ral ar·te·ry

(sū'pĕr-fish'ăl tem'pŏr-ăl ahr'tĕr-ē) [TA]
origin, a terminal branch of the external carotid (with maxillary artery); branches, transverse facial, middle temporal, orbital, parotid, anterior auricular, frontal, and parietal.
Synonym(s): arteria temporalis superficialis.

superficial temporal artery

An end branch of the external carotid artery; it supplies blood to the scalp in front of the ear and to the parotid glands. Its branches include the transverse facial, middle temporal, anterior auricular, zygomaticoorbital, frontal, and parietal arteries.
See also: artery
References in periodicals archive ?
Usually, GCA involves the carotid arteries and their branches, especially the temporal arteries.
When the posterior auricular is larger than usual it may be compensating for a deficiency in either the occipital or superficial temporal arteries.
In giant cell arteritis, the vessels most involved are those of the head, especially the temporal arteries.
The remaining branches--anterior and posterior parietal, gyrus angularis, and temporal arteries arise from the posterior trunk.
A cerebral angiogram demonstrated the mass to be supplied primarily by the branches of the left middle meningeal and superficial temporal arteries (Figure 3).
GCA has a typical acute onset of new headache with constitutional symptoms and thickened, tender temporal arteries.
The temporal arteries may be prominent, inflamed and non-pulsatile, and upon examination the clinician confirms an optic nerve swelling and a visual field defect, usually altitudinal.
Both temporal arteries were thickened, according to lead author Dr.
Giant cell arteritis is a rare systemic arterial inflammatory disease, classically characterized by chronic inflammation of the medium and small-sized arteries, most commonly the temporal arteries and extracranial branches of the aorta.
This inflammation particularly affects the temporal arteries on either side of the forehead.
Palpate the temporal arteries and pericranial muscles and examine the eyes.
The C-shaped flap was large, it had a broad base that spared both the occipital and superficial temporal arteries, it did not require thinning, and it was handled gently.