sauce béarnaise syndrome

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Related to Taste aversion: Garcia Effect

sauce béarnaise syndrome

An acquired and permanent conditioned response (e.g., severe nausea) which develops shortly after exposure to a particular stimulus (e.g., béarnaise sauce), as well as other tastes and odours.

First decribed by Martin Seligman 1972, after experiencing nausea following ingestion of béarnaise sauce, it was later developed by John Garcia as a rat model for conditioned taste aversion, using an array of noxious stimuli. Of the stimuli, only tastes and odours evoked the conditioned response, leading him to conclude that it was an evolutionary adaptation to avoid spoilt or poisonous food, which Garcia termed the preparedness hypothesis.
References in periodicals archive ?
The reduction of the taste aversion on the test day (i.
AAB and ABA renewal as a function of the number of extinction trials in conditioned taste aversion.
In these studies, the contextual control of LiCl-based taste aversion was unaffected by posttraining extinction treatments.
The purpose of the study was to examine the ability of Magtein to affect the extinction and spontaneous recovery (SR) on conditioned taste aversion.
1999) Blockade of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors in the insular cortex disrupts taste aversion and spatial memory formation.
Taste discrimination in conditioned taste aversion of the pond snail Lymnaea stagnalis.
Enhancement of inhibitory avoidance and conditioned taste aversion memory with insular cortex infusions of 8-Br-cAMP: involvement of the basolateral amygdala.
Taste aversion conditioning as a predator control method in the coyote and ferret.
We determined if this effect represents a response to nausea or illness induced by TRH injection by employing the conditioned taste aversion test.
In fact associations based on taste aversion experiments require only a single CS [right arrow] UCS pairing and animals are able to bridge very long delays between CS and UCS presentation.
He refers to the behavior as conditioned taste aversion, but many animal investigators call it simply the Garcia effect.