heart rate

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rate

 [rāt]
the speed or frequency with which an event or circumstance occurs per unit of time, population, or other standard of comparison.
adjusted rate a fictitious summary rate statistically adjusted to remove the effect of a variable, such as age or sex, to permit unbiased comparison between groups having different compositions with respect to these variables. See also crude rate and specific rate.
attack rate in the analysis of acute outbreaks of disease, the proportion of persons who are exposed to the disease during the outbreak who do become ill.
basal metabolic rate an expression of the rate at which oxygen is utilized in a fasting subject at complete rest as a percentage of a value established as normal for such a subject. Abbreviated BMR.
birth rate the number of live births in a geographic area in a defined period, usually one year, relative to some specified population. For the crude birth rate, it is the average total population or the midyear population in the area during the period. Specific birth rates for subsets of the population may also be calculated, for example, an age-specific birth rate is limited to the population of females of a defined age range.
case fatality rate the number of deaths due to a specific disease as compared to the total number of cases of the disease.
crude rate one giving the total number of events occurring in an entire population over a period of time, without reference to any of the individuals or subgroups within the population. See also adjusted rate and specific rate.
death rate the number of deaths in a certain period of time divided by the total of a given population. The crude death rate is the ratio of the number of deaths in a geographic area in one year divided by the average population in the area during the year. The age-specific death rate is the ratio of the number of deaths occurring in a specified age group to the average population of that group. The cause-specific death rate is the ratio of the number of deaths due to a specified cause to the average total population. Called also mortality rate.
Historic example of death rates (per 100,000) for leading causes of death for men aged 25–44 years. From Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 42:483, 1993.
DEF rate an expression of dental caries experienced in primary teeth, calculated by adding number of those requiring filling (D), decayed teeth requiring extraction (E), and those that have already been successfully filled (F); missing primary teeth are not included in the calculation.
DMF rate an expression of the condition of the permanent teeth based on the number of teeth decayed, missing (or indicated for removal), and filled or bearing restorations. It is calculated by adding the number of carious permanent teeth requiring filling (D), carious ones requiring extraction (Mr), ones previously extracted because of caries (Mp), and permanent teeth (F).
dose rate the amount of any therapeutic agent administered per unit of time.
erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) see erythrocyte sedimentation rate.
fatality rate the death rate in a specific group of persons simultaneously affected by some event or circumstances, such as a natural disaster.
fertility rate a measure of fertility in a defined population over a specified period of time, usually one year; particularly the general fertility rate, but also including more specific rates such as those for females of a given parity or a particular age range or that describing the completed rate for females who have finished childbearing.
fetal death rate the ratio of the number of fetal deaths in one year to the total number of both live births and fetal deaths in that year.
five-year survival rate an expression of the number of survivors with no trace of a given disease five years after each has been diagnosed or treated for the disease.
flow rate flow (def. 2).
forced expiratory flow rate forced expiratory flow.
general fertility rate the most widely used measure of fertility; the number of live births in a geographic area in a year per 1000 women of childbearing age, which is usually defined as age 15 to 44 years.
glomerular filtration rate an expression of the quantity of glomerular filtrate formed each minute in the nephrons of both kidneys, calculated by measuring the clearance of specific substances, e.g., inulin or creatinine.
growth rate an expression of the increase in size of an organic object per unit of time.
heart rate the number of contractions of the cardiac ventricles per unit of time (usually per minute).
incidence rate the risk of developing a particular disease during a given period of time; the numerator of the rate is the number of new cases during the specified time period and the denominator is the population at risk during the period. Compare prevalence r.
infant mortality rate the ratio of the number of deaths in one year of children less than one year of age to the number of live births in that year.
intrinsic rate in cardiac pacing terminology, the heart rate unaided by an artificial pacemaker, expressed in beats per minute (bpm). See also cycle length.
maternal mortality rate a rate in which the numerator is the number of maternal deaths ascribed to puerperal causes in one year; the number of live births in that year is often used as the denominator, although to make a true rate the denominator should be the number of pregnancies (live births plus fetal deaths). Called also puerperal mortality rate.
maximal expiratory flow rate (MEFR) maximal expiratory flow.
maximal midexpiratory flow rate (MMFR) maximal midexpiratory flow.
mendelian rate an expression of the numerical relations of the occurrence of distinctly contrasted mendelian characteristics in succeeding generations of hybrid offspring.
metabolic rate an expression of the amount of oxygen consumed by the body cells.
morbidity rate an inexact term that can mean either the incidence rate or the prevalence rate.
mortality rate death rate.
neonatal mortality rate the ratio of the number of deaths in one year of children less than 28 days of age to the number of live births in that year.
paced rate in cardiac pacing terminology, the rate of pulses of an artificial pacemaker, expressed as pulses per minute (ppm). See also cycle length.
perinatal mortality rate the ratio of the number of the sum of fetal deaths after 28 or more weeks of gestation (stillbirths) and deaths of infants less than 7 days of age in one time period and population to the sum of the number of live births and fetal deaths after 28 or more weeks of gestation (stillbirths) in that same time period and population.
postneonatal mortality rate the ratio of the number of deaths in a given year of children between the 28th day of life and the first birthday relative to the difference between the number of the live births and neonatal deaths in that year; the denominator is sometimes simplified, less correctly, to the number of live births. The ratio is sometimes approximated as the difference between the infant mortality rate and the neonatal mortality rate.
prevalence rate the number of people in a population who have a disease at a given time; the numerator is the number of existing cases of disease at a specified time and the denominator is the total population. Time may be a point or a defined interval, and is traditionally the former if unspecified. Compare incidence r.
puerperal mortality rate maternal mortality r.
pulse rate the rate of the pulse, measured as number of pulsations in an artery per unit of time; normally between 60 and 80 per minute in an adult.
respiration rate the number of inhalations and exhalations per unit of time, usually measured by observation of chest movements and averaging 16 to 20 per minute in an adult.
sedimentation rate the rate at which a sediment is deposited in a given volume of solution, especially when subjected to the action of a centrifuge; see also erythrocyte sedimentation rate.
slew rate in cardiac pacing, the rate, expressed in units of mV/msec, at which an R wave reaches peak amplitude; it represents the maximum rate of change of amplifier output voltage.
specific rate a rate that applies to a specific demographic subgroup, e.g., individuals of a specific age, sex, or race, giving the total number of events in relation only to that subgroup. See also adjusted rate and crude rate.
stillbirth rate fetal death rate.

heart rate

rate of the heart's beat, recorded as the number of beats per minute.

heart rate

n. Abbr. HR
The number of heartbeats per unit of time, usually expressed as beats per minute.

heart rate

the frequency with which the heart beats, calculated by counting the number of QRS complexes or ventricular beats per minute. See also pulse.

heart rate

The rate at which the heart contracts; greater than 100 beats per minute is labelled tachycardia, less than 60 beats per minute is labelled bradycardia. Resting bradycardia in trained athletes is normal.

heart rate

The number of heart beats/min; the rate at which the heart pumps blood; normal range, 50 to 90 beats/min

heart rate

(hahrt rāt)
Velocity of the heart's beat, recorded as the number of beats per minute.

heart rate

The number of contractions of the pumping chambers of the heart per minute. This varies with the degree of exertion. A low resting rate is, in general, an indication of the heart's efficiency. The average rate is between 70 and 85 beats per minute, but an athletic person may have a PULSE rate as low as 40 or 50.

heart rate

(hahrt rāt)
Velocity of the heart's beat, in number of beats per minute.

heart

the hollow muscular organ lying on the sternum that serves as a pump controlling the blood flow in two circuits, the pulmonary and the systemic. See also circulatory system.

artificial heart
a mechanical device that replaces the heart by using pulsating air to pump blood to the body. Successfully placed in calves, sheep and dogs as experimental models for the subsequent use of such methods in humans.
heart attack
see myocardial infarction.
heart bones
ossicles in the fibrous skeletal ring which surrounds the aortic orifice of the heart in cattle and occasionally in other species; called also ossa cordis.
heart conducting system
consists of the sinoatrial node, the atrioventricular node, the atrioventricular bundle and its two crura.
cyanotic heart malformations
insufficient oxygenated hemoglobin is received in the peripheral capillary beds resulting in blue discoloration of tissues, and an incapacity of the body to maintain a life-sustaining level of activity.
heart disease
an all-embracing term including those diseases in which there is intrinsic disease of the heart such as uremia, valvular disease, African horse sickness, vitamin E-selenium nutritional deficiency, inherited cardiomyopathies of dogs and cattle, altitude sickness, canine parvovirus infection, and in a number of plant and other poisonings. See also mulberry heart disease.
heart failure cells
hemosiderin-laden macrophages present in the pulmonary alveoli in cases of congestive heart failure.
heart malformations
includes ectopia cordis, patent foramen ovale, ventricular septal defects such as Fallot's tetralogy, Eisenmenger complex, patent ductus arteriosus, aortic coarctation, right aortic arch persistence, truncus arteriosus persistence, fibroelastosis, subvalvular aortic stenosis, anomalous origin of carotid arteries, transposition of great vessels, pulmonic stenosis, aortic stenosis.
heart massage
see cardiac massage.
heart meridian points
acupuncture points along the heart meridian.
heart rate
the number of contractions of the cardiac ventricles per unit of time. For normal rates see pulse rate.
heart score
a concept which sets out that performance in racing horses is related to heart size, now a well-established relationship, and that heart size can be estimated in the living horse by the measurement of the QRS interval.
heart sounds
see heart sounds, heart murmur.
heart strain
is an unpopular concept in any medical science but overtrained horses which perform poorly do have a high incidence of abnormal T waves.
heart valve anomalies
failure of complete development of atrioventricular or semilunar valves results in stenosis or incompetence of the valves and often congestive heart failure.
heart valve hematoma
congenital, usually multiple lesions on the edges of atrioventricular valves, mostly in calves; disappear spontaneously in most cases.
heart valve thrombosis
common lesion on the free edges of valves, often the source of widespread emboli; on healing leave scarred, insufficient valves.
heart valves
flaps of endothelial connective tissue that guard the entrance into and exit from the ventricles and bring about unidirectional blood flow. Include the atrioventricular and semilunar valves, the proper closure of which is essential to maintain circulatory equilibrium, can be diseased and cause heart failure. See also heart murmur, endocarditis, endocardiosis.

rate

the frequency with which an event or circumstance occurs per unit of time.

attack rate
the proportion of a population affected by a specific condition during a prescribed, usually short, period of time.
attribute-specific rate
the rate of occurrence of a specific attribute.
basal metabolic rate (BMR)
an expression of the rate at which oxygen is utilized in a fasting subject at complete rest as a percentage of a value established as normal for such a subject.
birth rate
the number of births during one year for the total population (crude birth rate), for the female population (refined birth rate), or for the female population of reproductive age (true birth rate).
case rate
morbidity rate.
case fatality rate
the number of deaths due to a specific disease as compared with the total number of cases of the disease.
cohort rate
the rate of occurrence of e.g. disease in cohorts.
death rate
the number of deaths per stated number of animals (1000 or 10,000 or 100,000) in a certain region in a certain time period.
erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR)
see erythrocyte sedimentation rate.
fatality rate
the number of deaths caused by a specific circumstance or disease, expressed as the absolute or relative number among individuals encountering the circumstance or having the disease.
five-year survival rate
an expression of the number of survivors with no trace of disease 5 years after each has been diagnosed or treated for the same disease.
forced expiratory flow rate (FEF)
see maximal expiratory flow rate (below).
glomerular filtration rate
an expression of the quantity of glomerular filtrate formed each minute in the nephrons of both kidneys, calculated by measuring the clearance of specific substances, e.g. inulin or creatinine.
growth rate
an expression of the increase in size of an organic object per unit of time.
heart rate
the number of contractions of the cardiac ventricles per unit of time.
incidence rate
describes the probability of a new case occurring during a stated time interval.
infection rate
percentage of the population from which a specific infectious pathogen is isolated.
rate-limiting enzymes
rate controlling enzymic steps in metabolic pathways. Often allosteric enzymes with allosteric effector sites but can be controlled through substrate availability, product removal or enzyme concentration.
maximal expiratory flow rate (MEFR)
the slope of the line connecting the points 200 ml and 1200 ml on the forced expiratory volume curve. See also pulmonary function tests. Called also FEF200-1200.
metabolic rate
an expression of the amount of oxygen consumed by the body cells.
morbidity rate
the number of cases of a given disease occurring in a specified period per unit of population.
mortality rate
death rate; the mortality rate of a disease is the ratio of the number of deaths from a given disease to the total number of cases of that disease.
reactor rate
percentage of reactors in a tested population.
respiration rate
the number of movements of the chest wall per unit of time, indicative of inspiration and expiration.
response rate
risk rate
see relative risk.
sedimentation rate
the rate at which a sediment is deposited in a given volume of solution, especially when subjected to the action of a centrifuge. See also sedimentation rate.
specific rate
expresses the frequency of a characteristic per unit of the population.
rate standardization
adaptation of a rate so that the conditions under which it occurred are comparable with those in which other rates have been estimated. There are several methods, e.g. the equivalent average death rate.

Patient discussion about heart rate

Q. Why do people with a better cardiovascular fitness have lower heart rate? I recently met my old friend and that too after long time. We did go out and had a blast. He did show me his medical report and I was shocked to find out that he was having lower heart rate than me but was having better cardiovascular. He told me that it was quite normal but It was bothering me a lot. How could it be possible and I do see this as a deficiency. My friend does not agree with me and he told me that nothing to worry. I did try to research and found nothing with this regards. I am unable to sleep and would like to know on this. Can someone help me with answers?. Why do people with a better cardiovascular fitness have lower heart rate?

A. A strong athletic heart gets more cardiac output per stroke.
Less strokes = more movement of blood per stoke
DrMDK

Q. I had my blood test as I was feeling dizzy and my heart rate was raised & I was diagnosed with hyperthyroidism I had my blood test as I was feeling dizzy and my heart rate was raised & I was diagnosed with hyperthyroidism. It had just started when I was taking herbs for depression and anxiety. I am not taking herbs now and still feeling dizzy. Has anyone had any problem with Chinese herbs?

A. My mom had hyperthyroidism, but not with herbs. Until she told the exact things to the doctor, her treatment was difficult and once she revealed the medicine history to the doctor she was very well treated. Similarly I expect from you to tell your doctor about the herbs you are taking and you must tell this to your Chinese medicine practitioner as well. There are chances that you may have high level of thyroid and these herbs just boosted them or increased them as Chinese medicine do not have high side effects. Please open to your doctor during investigation and treatment.

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