T-rays


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Related to T-rays: THz

T-rays

Tetraherz radiation, electromagnetic radiation of wavelength lying between the infrared and microwave radio waves. A method of generating T-waves has recently been developed and this radiation has been shown to be effective in detecting the precise extent of cancers lying immediately below the surface of the skin.
References in periodicals archive ?
described research focusing T-rays through donated samples of human skin that suggest the technology could be valuable in diagnosing melanoma.
Researchers from the Institute of Materials Research and Engineering (IMRE) in Singapore, and Imperial College London in the UK made T-rays into a much stronger directional beam than was thought possible, and have clone so at room-temperature conditions.
Terahertz Quantum Cascade Lasers and Real-time T-rays Imaging at video rate // Terahertz Science and Technology.
These abilities and others make T-rays appealing for a range of potential applications--from biological imaging to quality control (such as detecting an air bubble in a block of foam from the space shuttle) and seeing inside sealed packages.
That gap is beginning to disappear now that scientists have begun making T-rays and testing what they can do.
The T5000 collects these T-rays and processes them to form images that reveal objects hidden under clothing without displaying body detail and without subjecting people to any harmful radiation.
T-rays are electromagnetic radiation of the safe, non-ionizing kind.
Objects also emit T-rays and scientists believe explosives give off a particular T-ray "signature".
T-rays are electromagnetic waves with a wavelength shorter than microwave but longer than infrared.
London, Jan 21 ( ANI ): Biomedical detective devices similar to the 'tricorder' scanner used in 'Star Trek' may be possible someday, say scientists who have developed a new way to create electromagnetic Terahertz (THz) waves or T-rays - the technology behind full-body security scanners.
T-rays are electromagnetic waves with a wavelength 500 times longer than visible light.
T-RAYS, electromagnetic waves in the far-infrared part of the spectrum, could be harnessed to manufacture more effective sensors for detecting explosives and poisons.