T-group

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Related to T-groups: encounter groups

group

 [gro̳p]
1. an assemblage of objects having certain things in common.
2. a number of atoms forming a recognizable and usually transferable portion of a molecule.
activity g's groups of individuals with similar needs for occupational therapy who are working on the correction of problems that they hold in common.
azo group the bivalent radical, -N=N-.
blood group see blood group.
control group see control (def. 3).
Diagnosis-Related G's see diagnosis-related groups.
encounter group a sensitivity group in which the members strive to gain emotional rather than intellectual insight, with emphasis on the expression of interpersonal feelings in the group situation.
focus g's individuals with a common interest who meet to explore a problem in depth.
PLT group [psittacosis-lymphogranuloma venereum-trachoma] alternative name for genus Chlamydia.
prosthetic group
1. an organic radical, nonprotein in nature, which together with a protein carrier forms an enzyme.
2. a cofactor tightly bound to an enzyme, i.e., it is an integral part of the enzyme and not readily dissociated from it.
3. a cofactor that may reversibly dissociate from the protein component of an enzyme; a coenzyme.
sensitivity group (sensitivity training group) a nonclinical group intended for persons without severe emotional problems, focusing on self-awareness, self-understanding, and interpersonal interactions and aiming to develop skills in leadership, management, counseling, or other roles. Called also T-group and training group.
support group
1. a group made up of individuals with a common problem, usually meeting to express feelings, vent frustrations, and explore effective coping strategies. Education is a component of some support groups.
2. in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as the use of a group environment to provide emotional support and health-related information for members.
support group (omaha) in the omaha system, regular planned gatherings to accomplish some compatible goal.
group therapy a form of psychotherapy in which a group of patients meets regularly with a group leader, usually a therapist. The group may be balanced, having patients with diverse problems and attitudes, or it may be composed of patients who all have similar diagnoses or issues to resolve. In some groups, patients may be basically mentally healthy but trying to work through external stressors, such as job loss, natural disasters, or physical illness. Self-help groups are groups of people with a commonality of diagnosis (e.g., alcoholism, overeating, or a particular chronic physical illness) or of experience (e.g., rape, incest) and a leader who may be not a therapist but rather one who has experienced a similar problem or situation.

From hearing how the group leader or other members feel about this behavior, the patient may gain insight into his or her anxieties and conflicts. The group may provide emotional support for self-revelation and a structured environment for trying out new ways of relating to people. In contrast, there are other groups that focus on altering behavior, with less or minimal attention paid to gaining insight into the causes of the problems.
therapy group in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as the application of psychotherapeutic techniques to a group, including the utilization of interactions between members of the group. See also group therapy.
training group sensitivity group.

T-group

(tē′gro͞op′)
n.
A group engaged in a form of training in which members, lead by a trainer, observe and learn about small group dynamics in an attempt to improve interpersonal relationships and communication skills.

T-group

A group of people who meet in training sessions to become more sensitive to their own emotions and attitudes and to those of others.
References in periodicals archive ?
The T-Group trainer intervenes to help participants speak their truths (to be themselves) and remain in the here and now.
We have yet to launch a T-Group process that did not meet with initial and sometimes protracted resistance.
It is hard to explain, with any modicum of precision or clarity, what the participants will learn from an extended T-Group experience.
Knowing that we never can give very satisfying answers to these angry and frustrating inquiries (although we keep trying), we rely more on a plea to "willingly suspend disbelief" and trust us that something good will ultimately come chucking out of the T-Group meat grinder.
The frustrations that group participants experience in the early T-Group iterations often mirror frustrations that are "on the surface" in other group venues in their lives.
As group members become more comfortable with their T-Group sessions, and replace resistance to the group encounters with buy-in, they begin to notice patterns of behaviors--their own and those of their fellow participants--that contain important information.
Finally, the best visualization for appreciating the application of T-Group work to EQ training is the Conviction/Connection Model (Diagram 1).
In essence, that is what you are tasked to do as a participant in T-Group training--to stay in that circle as your authentic self, in the present moment, telling your truth.
Through repetitions of T-Group experiences, we change.
In its essence, the T-Group tasks its members to be more emotionally intelligent--and through protracted practice and feedback, leads to the changes that need to be made.
In this schema, we assume a T-Group comprised of six participants, with a second group (the B's) seated as observers in the outer circle.
Appendix 3 T-Group Simulation Examples of Leader Interventions