syncope


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syncope

 [sing´kah-pe]
faint. adj. adj syn´copal, syncop´ic.
cardiac syncope sudden loss of consciousness, either with momentary premonitory symptoms or without warning, due to cerebral anemia caused by ventricular asystole, extreme bradycardia, or ventricular fibrillation.
laryngeal syncope tussive syncope.
neurocardiogenic syncope a particularly serious type of vasovagal attack; the etiology is unknown.
stretching syncope syncope associated with stretching the arms upward with the spine extended.
swallow syncope syncope associated with swallowing, a disorder of atrioventricular conduction mediated by the vagus nerve.
tussive syncope brief loss of consciousness associated with paroxysms of coughing.
vasovagal syncope vasovagal attack.

syn·co·pe

(sin'kŏ-pē),
Loss of consciousness and postural tone caused by diminished cerebral blood flow.
[G. synkopē, a cutting short, a swoon]

syncope

/syn·co·pe/ (-ko-pe) a faint; temporary loss of consciousness due to generalized cerebral ischemia.syn´copalsyncop´ic
cardiac syncope  sudden loss of consciousness, with momentary premonitory symptoms or without warning, due to cerebral anemia caused by obstructions to cardiac output or arrhythmias such as ventricular asystole, extreme bradycardia, or ventricular fibrillation.
carotid sinus syncope  see under syndrome.
convulsive syncope  syncope with convulsive movements that are milder than those seen in epilepsy.
laryngeal syncope  tussive syncope
stretching syncope  syncope associated with stretching the arms upward with the spine extended.
swallow syncope  syncope associated with swallowing, a disorder of atrioventricular conduction mediated by the vagus nerve.
tussive syncope  brief loss of consciousness associated with paroxysms of coughing.
vasovagal syncope  see under attack.

syncope

(sĭng′kə-pē, sĭn′-)
n.
1. Grammar The shortening of a word by omission of a sound, letter, or syllable from the middle of the word; for example, bos'n for boatswain.
2. Medicine A brief loss of consciousness caused by inadequate blood flow to the brain.

syn′co·pal (sĭng′kə-pəl, sĭn′-), syn·cop′ic (sĭn-kŏp′ĭk) adj.

syncope

[sing′kəpē]
Etymology: Gk, synkoptein, to cut short
a brief lapse in consciousness caused by transient cerebral hypoxia. It is usually preceded by a sensation of light-headedness and often may be prevented by lying down or by sitting with the head between the knees. It may be caused by many different factors, including emotional stress, vagal stimulation, vascular pooling in the legs, diaphoresis, and a sudden change in environmental temperature or body position. Also called fainting.

syncope

Neurology A transient loss of consciousness not explained by other altered states of consciousness in the history of the Pt, often linked to cerebral ischemia; fainting, loss of conciousness or vertigo due to a transient arrhythmia, cardiac conduction–heart block, or neurovascular tone. See Carotid sinus syncope, Deglutition syncope, Neurocardiogenic syncope, Seder syncope, Seinfeld syncope, Sushi syncope.

syn·co·pe

(sing'kŏ-pē)
Loss of consciousness and postural tone caused by diminished cerebral blood flow.
[G. synkopē, cutting short]

syncope

Fainting.

Syncope

A loss of consciousness over a short period of time, caused by a temporary lack of oxygen in the brain.
Mentioned in: Tilt Table Test

syncope

; psychogenic shock; faint; vasovagal attack sudden fall in blood pressure causing cerebral anoxia and temporary loss of consciousness; characterized by light-headedness/dizziness, low blood pressure, pallor and sweating, yawning, nausea and vomiting, slow/weak/thready pulse, dilated pupils and muscular twitching; patient should be lain flat, with airway open and head to one side, and legs elevated to increase cerebral circulation; differential diagnoses should include postural hypotension, hyperventilation, hypoglycaemia, cardiac arrhythmias or adrenal insufficiency

syncope (singˑ·k·pē),

n a sudden but temporary loss of consciousness due to insufficient blood supply to the brain; may be caused by vagal stimulation, emotional stress, blood loss, diaphoresis, or an immediate change in the position of the body or surrounding temperature. Also called
fainting.

syn·co·pe

(sing'kŏ-pē)
Loss of consciousness and postural tone due to diminished cerebral blood flow.
[G. synkopē, cutting short]

syncope, (sing´kəpē),

n fainting; tem-porary suspension of consciousness caused by cerebral anemia. See also shock.

syncope

a temporary suspension of consciousness due to cerebral anemia; fainting.

cardiac syncope
sudden loss of consciousness due to cerebral anemia caused by ventricular asystole, extreme bradycardia or ventricular fibrillation.
drug-induced syncope
may result from abnormalities of cardiac rhythm, caused by treatment with digitalis, and hypotension caused by drugs such as diuretics, promazine and phenothiazine tranquilizers, and peripheral vasodilating agents.
laryngeal syncope
tussive syncope.
Stokes-Adams syncope
swallow syncope
syncope associated with swallowing, a disorder of atrioventricular conduction mediated by the vagus nerve.
tussive syncope
brief loss of consciousness associated with paroxysms of coughing.
vasovagal syncope
see vasovagal attack.

Patient discussion about syncope

Q. i am 12 and my hair is falling out what do i do? there is like a hair ball in my tub

A. First of all you are going through puberty and the hormonal levels in your body are changing, this could cause accelerated hair loss that will go away. However, if you feel like you are having severe hair loss you should go and get blood tests for the evaluation of several vitamin defficiencies (B12, Folic acid and Iron), that can be the reason. Soemtimes a lack in our nutrition can be the reason for losing hair.

Q. I found out 1week ago i was 6wks pregnant and lastnight i passed a 1/2dollar size clear ball did i miscarrie? the ball was clear,soft and jellie like and it came w/a lot of blood but i didnt see no signs of a baby or anything like that

A. Possibly, but not essentially. In this age the embryo is quite small (several millimeters), so you may easily mistaken it. My best advice is to consult a doctor (e.g. gynecologist) so an US or other test can be done to accurately diagnose a miscarriage.

Take care,

More discussions about syncope
References in periodicals archive ?
Severe hypotension and syncope occurs when Addyi is used with moderate or strong CYP3A4 inhibitors or in patients with hepatic impairment; therefore use of Addyi in patients with hepatic impairment is also contraindicated.
Professor Morice said: "Amnesia is typical in a patient who has cough syncope.
When the data were further analyzed by vaccine dose, only syncope on the day of vaccination and skin infection during the 2 weeks after remained significant.
We appreciate the authors for their interest in reference to our article entitled 'A case of Iatrogenic hypothyroidism presented with cardio-inhibitory syncope and resolved with levothyroxine supplementation' in The Anatolian Journal of Cardiology in March 2012 (1).
On a memorable occasion, in a busy Tokyo subway station, five Kargmans participated in one syncope.
Syncope due to carotid sinus hypersensitivity occurs in the setting of shaving, a tight collar, or turning the head to one side, as well as in cases of carotid occlusion, neck tumors and after radiotherapy.
With the initiation of insurance coverage, the device will mainly be sold to medical institutions which specialize in unexplained syncope or arrhythmia.
Although HPV4 vaccine was the most frequently reported vaccine associated with syncope when only one vaccine was given (52%), that is likely due to the fact that three doses of this vaccine are given (as opposed to one each for MCV4 and Tdap), as well as to the increased publicity and media attention surrounding HPV4 vaccine.
Syncope and transient loss of consciousness; multidisciplinary management.
Vasovagal syncope, also known as fainting, is a transient, self-terminating loss of consciousness caused by a sudden reduction in blood flow to the brain due to a decrease in blood pressure.
In a small group of patients with recurrent unprovoked syncope due to cardiovascular causes, the heart rate drops dramatically before the fainting episode and a pacemakers can detect this and treat it by stimulating the heart to beat faster.