symbolism

(redirected from Symbolists)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to Symbolists: symbolism

symbolism

 [sim´bah-lizm]
1. the act or process of representing something by a symbol.
2. in psychoanalytic theory, a mechanism of unconscious thinking characterized by substitution of a symbol for a repressed or threatening impulse or object, which is often of a sexual nature, so as to avoid censorship by the superego.

sym·bol·ism

(sim'bŏl-izm),
1. In psychoanalysis, the process involved in the disguised representation in consciousness of unconscious or repressed contents or events.
2. A mental state in which a person regards everything that happens as symbolic of that person's own thoughts.
3. The description of the emotional life and experiences in abstract terms.

symbolism

/sym·bol·ism/ (sim´bo-lizm)
1. the act or process of representing something by a symbol.
2. in psychoanalytic theory, a mechanism of unconscious thinking characterized by substitution of a symbol for a repressed or threatening impulse or object so as to avoid censorship by the superego.

symbolism

[sim′bəlizəm]
1 the representation or evocation of one idea, action, or object by the use of another, as in systems of writing, poetic language, or dream metaphor.
2 (in psychiatry) an unconscious mental mechanism characteristic of all human thinking in which a mental image stands for but disguises some other object, person, or thought, especially one associated with emotional conflict. The mechanism is a principal factor in the formation of dreams and in various symptoms resulting from such anxious and psychotic conditions as conversion reactions, obsessions, and compulsions. Also called symbolization.

sym·bol·ism

(sim'bŏl-izm)
1. psychoanalysis The process involved in the disguised representation in consciousness of unconscious or repressed contents or events.
2. A mental state in which one regards everything that happens as symbolic of one's own thoughts.
3. The description of the emotional life and experiences in abstract terms.
References in periodicals archive ?
Although critics have often situated these symbolist novels within the decadent movement, the author suggests that the key difference between the two lies in the gravity of symbolism versus decadent dilettantism.
Parallels are drawn primarily with the work of Moreas and Heredia, whose inspiration was vital for George in his pioneering adaptation of the French Symbolist credo to German poetry.
In 1888, Emile Bernard and Paul Gauguin were the first Symbolist artists to exploit the Baudelairian connections of color and sound through the development of Cloisonism, a style of painting that divided the canvas into color-rich regions.
18) Both More and Wilson have political concerns alien to the symbolists.
By these minimal means she could suggest the immolation of Wagner's Briinnhilde; for this we have the witness of the Symbolist poet Georges Rodenbach, who was an aficionado of her art.
Poets of Hope and Despair presents Ben Hellman's personal reading of the Russian symbolist poets' ideologies during World War I, such poets as Andrei Bely, Alexander Blok, Zinaida Hippius, Dmitri Merezhkovsky, Fyodor Sologub, and others.
If one were to choose the latter path, one would look more closely at Mikhail Kuzmin, for example, and particularly at Innokentii Annenskii, a poet whose work has far more in common with the writings of the leading French Symbolist poets than does that of any of the acknowledged Russian Symbolists, and who, more significantly, seems to be a more interesting poet and to have exerted a greater influence on a larger number of leading Russian poets than almost all his contemporaries.
43) Symbolists exploring the imagination, accordingly, would have to have their sacred texts.
These volumes are a joy to handle, so beautifully produced are they, quarter bound in blue and grey cloth, and are part of Woodstock's designated `Decadents, Symbolists, Anti-Decadents' list.
French poet of the mid-19th century who was a late disciple of the Romantics, a leader of the Parnassian movement, and an influence on the Symbolists.
Deak devotes a chapter to Richard Wagner's influence on the French symbolists, pointing out where they differed with Wagner (for example, on the function of myths), and how the symbolist production of Edouard Dujardin's Legend of Antonia put a French version of Wagnerian drama on stage.