symbolism

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symbolism

 [sim´bah-lizm]
1. the act or process of representing something by a symbol.
2. in psychoanalytic theory, a mechanism of unconscious thinking characterized by substitution of a symbol for a repressed or threatening impulse or object, which is often of a sexual nature, so as to avoid censorship by the superego.

sym·bol·ism

(sim'bŏl-izm),
1. In psychoanalysis, the process involved in the disguised representation in consciousness of unconscious or repressed contents or events.
2. A mental state in which a person regards everything that happens as symbolic of that person's own thoughts.
3. The description of the emotional life and experiences in abstract terms.

symbolism

/sym·bol·ism/ (sim´bo-lizm)
1. the act or process of representing something by a symbol.
2. in psychoanalytic theory, a mechanism of unconscious thinking characterized by substitution of a symbol for a repressed or threatening impulse or object so as to avoid censorship by the superego.

symbolism

[sim′bəlizəm]
1 the representation or evocation of one idea, action, or object by the use of another, as in systems of writing, poetic language, or dream metaphor.
2 (in psychiatry) an unconscious mental mechanism characteristic of all human thinking in which a mental image stands for but disguises some other object, person, or thought, especially one associated with emotional conflict. The mechanism is a principal factor in the formation of dreams and in various symptoms resulting from such anxious and psychotic conditions as conversion reactions, obsessions, and compulsions. Also called symbolization.

sym·bol·ism

(sim'bŏl-izm)
1. psychoanalysis The process involved in the disguised representation in consciousness of unconscious or repressed contents or events.
2. A mental state in which one regards everything that happens as symbolic of one's own thoughts.
3. The description of the emotional life and experiences in abstract terms.
References in periodicals archive ?
Any consideration of Wright's poetry and its place in African American (as well as American) literary tradition must begin with what by now are the traditional literary historical readings of the symbolist movement from the 1840s and 1850s.
In 1888, Emile Bernard and Paul Gauguin were the first Symbolist artists to exploit the Baudelairian connections of color and sound through the development of Cloisonism, a style of painting that divided the canvas into color-rich regions.
Furthermore, by describing her eroticism as mystical and otherworldly as opposed to human and carnal, Ribeiro helped forever seal her fate to be regarded exclusively as a symbolist.
18) Both More and Wilson have political concerns alien to the symbolists.
By these minimal means she could suggest the immolation of Wagner's Briinnhilde; for this we have the witness of the Symbolist poet Georges Rodenbach, who was an aficionado of her art.
Bartlett does introduce critical concepts from Russian folk tradition, for example, the khorovod (ancient "mystical choral dance") and the obshchina (the commune), and explain how these cultural rites and features, especially as interpreted by Russian symbolists, equate to planks in Wagner's aesthetic platform.
Drawing on a solid theoretical framework mainly informed by psychoanalysis and gender theory, his analysis appeals to "the sophisticated ears of postmodern readers" (13) because of the intricate web it discloses, a literary web which establishes connections between the Gothic and the Symbolist tradition and in which the peculiar anxiety of influence evidenced in the writings of the scapigliati comes to the fore.
48) A reviewer for the Saturday Review echoed similar judgments and added that he could not quite understand why Symons had linked together the figures he labelled Symbolists.
Symons was grateful for the help Yeats gave him with writing his book The Symbolist Movement in Literature (1899).
But the museum has now put such doubts to rest with yet another Symbolist exhibition, this time clearly the obsessed preoccupation of its curator.
1) Edited by Leib Yaffe in collaboration with the poet Vladislav Khodasevich, the collection consisted of translations of the major Hebrew poets living in Russia at that time by distinguished Russian Symbolists.