Swyer syndrome


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Swyer syndrome

(swī'ĕr),
gonadal dysgenesis in phenotypic females with XY genotype.

Swyer syndrome

(swī'ĕr),
gonadal dysgenesis in phenotypic females with XY genotype.

Swyer syndrome

A condition (OMIM:400044) characterised by male-to-female sex reversal in the presence of a normal 46,XY karyotype. The (male) gonads undergo rapid and early degeneration, which appear in the adult as “streak gonads” consisting mainly of fibrous tissue and ovarian stroma; the patients do not develop secondary sexual characteristics at puberty. Their external genitalia is completely female, and Müllerian structures are normal.

Molecular pathology
Defects of SRY, which encodes testis-determining factor, cause Swyer syndrome.

Swy·er syn·drome

(swī'ĕr sin'drōm)
Gonadal dysgenesis in phenotypic females with XY genotype.
References in periodicals archive ?
Despite having XY chromosomes, the patient with Swyer syndrome appears female and has functional female genitalia and structures, including a vagina, uterus and fallopian tubes.
Dysgerminoma in three patients with Swyer syndrome.
107) In Swyer syndrome, (108) also referred to as 46,XY pure gonadal dysgenesis, individuals have a female phenotype with unambiguously female genitalia at birth, normal mullerian structures, and presentation associated with primary amenorrhea.
The testis, the source of anti-Mullerian hormone, is not present in Swyer syndrome.
Swyer syndrome tends to present at puberty, and in most cases a mature female phenotype does not develop.