Swank diet


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Swank diet

A diet for multiple sclerosis developed in the 1940s by an American neurologist, Roy L Swank. The Swank diet eliminates saturated fats in meats and baked products, lard, butter, palm oil, coconuts, coconut oil, hydrogenated and partially hydrogenated oils, and chocolate; caffeinated beverages, olives, avocados, and sugar are limited.

Accroding to Swank’s data, patients with multiple sclerosis who followed his diet for 20 or more years had fewer exacerbations of disease, fewer deaths and less disability; their cholesterol fell by an average of 150 mg/dl, and thus had a lower risk of coronary artery disease. Swank’s data was published in Lancet in 1990, and a later followup of the original patients found no further deterioration of disease; however, the greater medical community questions Swank’s results given that his study was not double-blinded.
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Along with conventional medicine, she's found benefits in the Swank Diet, acupuncture treatments and general work on body mechanics.
Contrary to Judi Hasson's "Is There an MS Diet" (Fall 2008), the Swank diet does not ban "all dairy products, glutens (found in wheat), legumes (meaning beans and peas) and virtually all saturated fat from animal sources.
According to the MS International Foundation's Medical Management Committee, "The Swank diet is an inexpensive and relatively safe dietary approach that has produced suggestive results in a limited MS clinical study.
Some doctors who look to a more aggressive eating plan to deal with MS support the Swank Diet, a stringent low-fat diet developed by Dr.
Swank's results, and there is no generally accepted proof that the Swank diet really controls MS.