surgical site infection


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surgical site infection

Surgery Any superficial infection that occurs at the site of a surgical incision
Surgical site infection classes
I  Clean wound–75% of all surgery; nontraumatic wound; noninflamed; no break in technique; no entry into the GI, GU, respiratory tracts, or oropharynx; infection rate < 5%, usually ±1%
II  Clean-contaminated wound; minimal break in surgical technique; infection rate < 10%
III  Contaminated wound: open, fresh, traumatic wound from relatively clean source, or major break in surgical technique; infection rate < 20%
IV Dirty and/or infected wound with devitalized and/or necrotic tissue; infection rate 30–40%

surgical site infection

An infection that occurs within thirty days of an operation, either at the suture line, just beneath it, or in internal organs and spaces that were operated upon.
Synonym: surgical wound infection
See also: infection
References in periodicals archive ?
Presurgical skin preparation with a novel 2% chlorhexidine gluconate cloth reduces rates of surgical site infection in orthopaedic surgical patients.
Surgical Site Infections (SSI) are an important postoperative complication second only to urinary tract infection.
It concluded that there is insufficient evidence to state whether removing hair impacts surgical site infection or when is the best time to remove hair; however, if it is necessary to remove hair, then both clipping and depilatory creams result in fewer SSIs than shaving with a razor.
Surgical site infections, International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium (INICC) report, data summary of 30 countries, 2005-2010.
Understanding perioperative risk factors, and implementing simple protocol to address them, can significantly decrease surgical site infections in an orthopaedic practice.
Operating room ventilation with laminar airflow shows no protective effect on the surgical site infection rate in orthopedic and abdominal surgery.
healthcare system more than $35 billion annually, with Centers for Disease Control figures suggesting that surgical site infections account for more than 30 percent of all HAIs in hospitalized patients.
Evidence for using Chlorhexidine gluconate for pre-operative cleansing to reduce the risk of surgical site infection.
Comparison of the prevalence of surgical site infection with use of sterile versus nonsterile gloves for resection and reconstruction during Mohs surgery.
The wound infection was to be labeled as superficial Surgical Site Infection (SSSI) if involving only skin and subcutaneous tissue whereas in case of involvement below musculo-fascial plane it was to be considered as Deep Surgical Site Infection (DSSI).