sulfate

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sulfate

 [sul´fāt]
a salt of sulfuric acid.

sul·fate

(sŭl'fāt),
A salt or ester of sulfuric acid.

sulfate

/sul·fate/ (sul´fāt) a salt of sulfuric acid.

sulfate (SO42-)

[sul′fāt]
an anion of sulfuric acid. A sulfate is usually a combination of a metal with sulfuric acid. Natural sulfate compounds, such as sodium sulfate, calcium sulfate, and potassium sulfate, are plentiful in the body.

sul·fate

(sŭl'fāt)
A salt or ester of sulfuric acid.

sulfate

a salt of sulfuric acid.

sulfate conjugation
an important in vivo mechanism for the detoxication mechanism for phenols and aliphatic alcohols.
high sulfate diets
associated with increased prevalence of polioencephalomalacia in ruminants.
References in periodicals archive ?
within the top 50 cm depth range) from the ASS samples (interferences from soluble sulfate minerals would be minimised in these surface samples).
Poorly crystalline secondary Fe/AI hydroxy sulfate minerals such as jarosite, schwertmannite, and basaluminite are found in ASS due to the favourable conditions in those environments for their precipitation (McElnea et al.
Hence, they introduced a separate extraction step with 4 M HC1 that would enable the dissolution of jarosite and other relatively insoluble Fe/Al hydroxy sulfate minerals and, in turn, enable the determination of the RA fraction using the quantity of liberated sulfate.
NAS] is that both schwertmannite and jarosite, and some A1 hydroxy sulfate minerals (except basaluminite), are insoluble in 1 M KC1 but completely soluble in 4M HC1 (McElnea et al.
However, RA, which is generated by the hydrolysis of relatively insoluble Fe/Al hydroxy sulfate minerals (e.
For example, many of the detected sulfate minerals can form only in relatively acidic waters, while many of the detected clay and carbonate minerals can only form in relatively neutral to slightly alkaline waters.
Hence the TPA measurement is not recovering acidity retained by these insoluble sulfate minerals (particularly jarosite).
Thus, some of the increase in TAA with time for these soils could have been due to dissolution of jarosite or other sparingly soluble sulfate minerals, in addition to the oxidation of sulfides.
2] as extractant for TAA titrations in ASS was to measure the acidity retained in insoluble sulfate minerals such as jarosite.
86) of the 1 : 5 blended soil, relative to that in the first extract of the unblended soil, indicates the retention of sulfate by Bauxsol[TM], possibly through sulfate adsorption or formation of basic sulfate minerals (Lin et al.