sugar pill


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sugar pill

Medspeak
A colloquial term most commonly used by mainstream health professionals for a placebo (which often contains lactose), regardless of whether or not it contains sugar.  

Popular health
A lay term for any oral agent used to control diabetes.
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References in periodicals archive ?
They need to compare drug products against other drugs that treat the same indication rather than comparing a drug against a sugar pill.
Actually, that useless sugar pill wasn't so useless; it demonstrated, and we are enthusiastic believers in, the power of the mind and spirit to transform lives and improve health.
If something makes me feel better I don't mind if it's a sugar pill or medicine as long as it works and doesn't harm me.
Some compared one statin to another, while others compared a statin to an inactive placebo, which is often called a sugar pill or dummy pill.
In the study, the researchers randomly divided patients into two groups - one received the antibiotic and the other was given a placebo, an inert treatment in the form of a sugar pill, three times a day for seven days.
But only because the human mind is considerably more powerful than a sugar pill.
It may be a sugar pill or a medication that hasn't been adequately proven to be effective.
The team from the University of Copenhagen analyzed data using information from trials sponsored by Sanofi on more than 4,000 patients receiving either a sugar pill or a 20-milligram-a-day dose of the medicine.
Placebo: a pill or substance with no effect on the body, such as a sugar pill.
Some physicians wonder, though, whether the benefits result from a placebo effect--faith in the remedy confers healing power to it even though it has no more physical effect than a sugar pill.
The response mechanism is not well understood, but the patient's belief that the sugar pill or sham surgery is going to help him somehow triggers an inborn healing response.
But isoflavones from red clover failed to cut the frequency of hot flashes any more than a sugar pill in a study of 246 menopausal women who were experiencing at least 35 hot flashes a week.