Streptococcus pyogenes


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Related to Streptococcus pyogenes: Corynebacterium diphtheriae, Bordetella pertussis

Streptococcus

 [strep″to-kok´us]
a genus of gram-positive, facultatively aerobic cocci (family Streptococcaceae) occurring in pairs or chains. It is separable into the pyogenic group, the viridans group, the enterococcus group, and the lactic group. The first group includes the beta-hemolytic human and animal pathogens; the second and third include alpha-hemolytic parasitic forms occurring as normal flora in the upper respiratory tract and the intestinal tract, respectively; and the fourth is made up of saprophytic forms.
Streptococcus mu´tans a species implicated in dental caries.
Streptococcus pneumo´niae a small, slightly elongated, encapsulated coccus, one end of which is pointed or lance-shaped; the organisms commonly occur in pairs. This is the most common cause of lobar pneumonia, and it also causes serious forms of meningitis, septicemia, empyema, and peritonitis. There are some 80 serotypes distinguished by the polysaccharide hapten of the capsular substance. Called also pneumococcus.
Streptococcus pyo´genes a beta-hemolytic, toxigenic, pyogenic species that causes septic sore throat, scarlet fever, rheumatic fever, puerperal fever, acute glomerulonephritis, and other conditions in humans.

Strep·to·coc·cus py·og·e·nes

a bacterial species found in the human mouth, throat, and respiratory tract and in inflammatory exudates, the bloodstream, and cellulitic lesions in human diseases; it is sometimes found in the udders of cows and in dust from sickrooms, hospital wards, schools, theaters, and other public places; it causes the formation of pus, fatal septicemia, and necrotizing fascitis and myositis. There is also a specific somatic antigen (M protein) for each of the approximately 85 types. It is the type species of the genus Streptococcus.

Streptococcus pyogenes

Etymology: Gk, streptos, curved, kokkos, berry, pyon, pus, genein, to produce
a species of streptococcus with many strains that are pathogenic to humans, including the beta-hemolytics in Lancefield group A. It causes suppurative diseases, such as scarlet fever and strep throat.

Strep·to·coc·cus py·og·e·nes

(strep'tō-kok'ŭs pī-oj'ĕ-nēz)
A bacterial species found in the human mouth, throat, and respiratory tract and in inflammatory exudates, bloodstream, and lesions in human diseases; it is sometimes found in the udders of cows and in dust from sickrooms, hospital wards, schools, theaters, and other public places; it causes the formation of pus or even fatal septicemias.

Streptococcus pyogenes

A common bacterium that causes strep throat and can also cause tonsillitis.
Mentioned in: Tonsillitis

Streptococcus pyogenes

streptococcal species; cause pus formation

Strep·to·coc·cus py·og·e·nes

(strep'tō-kok'ŭs pī-oj'ĕ-nēz)
A bacterial species found in the human mouth, throat, and respiratory tract and in inflammatory exudates, bloodstream, and lesions in human diseases found in dust from sickrooms, hospital wards, schools, theaters, and other public places; causes formation of pus or even fatal septicemias.

Streptococcus

a genus of gram-positive, predominantly facultatively anaerobic cocci in the family Streptococcaceae occurring in pairs or chains. It is classifiable in several ways, none of them completely satisfactory in terms of species designation. Sherman's classification was based on tolerance tests. The system used most widely in veterinary bacteriology is Lancefield's grouping based on serological tests.
Another means of differentiating streptococci is on the basis of type of hemolysis produced around colonies grown on sheep blood agar. Alpha (α) is partial hemolysis or greening of the agar. Beta (β) hemolysis is seen as a clear zone and gamma (γ) is no hemolysis. Most of the pathogenic species are β hemolytic.

Streptococcus agalactiae
causes mastitis in cattle, goats and sheep, neonatal septicemia and urogenital infections in dogs and cats.
Streptococcus avium, Streptococcus durans, Streptococcus faecalis, Streptococcus faecium and Streptococcus gallinarum
reclassified in the genus enterococcus. Now called Enterococcus avium etc.
Streptococcus bovis
an important organism in the development of lactic acidosis in cattle following carbohydrate engorgement because of its capacity to ferment starch to lactic acid.
Streptococcus canis (canus)
isolated from cases of septicemia and adenitis in puppies and kittens.
Streptococcus dysgalactiae
causes mastitis in cows, ewes and goat does and polyarthritis in lambs.
Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis
causes suppurative arthritis in piglets and abscesses in lymph nodes of the head and neck of horses. Also a cause of cervicitis in mares. Previously called S. equisimilis.
Streptococcus equi subsp. equi
causes strangles in horses.
Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus
occurs as a secondary infection in most species, particularly in horses in wounds, as a cause of cervicitis and a secondary infection associated with the viral infections of the upper respiratory tract. A cause of metritis and mastitis in cattle and septicemia in lambs, pigs and poultry. Previously called S. zooepidemicus.
Streptococcus equinus
causes opportunist infections in many species.
Streptococcus parauberis, Streptococcus uberis, Streptococcus viridans
may cause mastitis in cows.
Streptococcus pneumoniae
formerly called Diplococcus pneumoniae; pneumococcus, causes pneumonia in humans, nonhuman primates, guinea pigs and calves and mastitis in cattle, and septicemia and arthritis in cats.
Streptococcus porcinus
Streptococcus pyogenes
a cause of lymphangitis in foals and an uncommon cause of bovine mastitis. An important pathogen of humans.
Streptococcus spp. biovar 1
causes disease in cultured finfish.
Streptococcus suis
has at least 35 capsular types many of which can cause streptococcal meningitis and arthritis in pigs. There is geographic variance in the importance of individual serotypes but types 1,2,3,4,7,8 and 11 are common pathogens. Infection with type 2 is particularly common and is a zoonosis as is type 14. Immunity to disease can be engendered by vaccination but is serotype specific.
References in periodicals archive ?
Antimicrobial susceptibility of Streptococcus pyogenes in Central Eastern, and Baltic European Countries, 2005 to 2006: the cefditoren surveillance program.
Protein F1 is required for efficient entry of Streptococcus pyogenes into epithelial cells.
A novel erythromycin resistance methylase gene in Streptococcus pyogenes.
Ardanuy C, Domenech A, RoloD, Molecular characterization of macrolide- and multi-drug resistant Streptococcus pyogenes isolated from adult patients in Barcelona, Spain (1993-2008).
Alpha haemolytic Streptococcus pyogenes is responsible for most of necrotising fasciitis in the head and neck region.
Proteomic analysis and identification of streptococcus pyogenes surface-associated proteins.
Keywords: Echinacea purpurea Anti-bacterial Anti-inflammatory Streptococcus pyogenes Hemophilus influenza Legionella pneumophila MRSA
Paediatric dermatologist Dr Atherton says: "One in 10 healthy people carry streptococcus pyogenes in their throats without any symptoms, and these people are the source of infections in the rest of us.
Clinical Cure by Organism Ceftaroline Vanco/Az Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus 93% 95% MRSA 95% 95% MSSA 91% 95% Streptococcus pyogenes 100% 100% Streptococcus agalactiae 93% 100% Enterococcus faecalis 93% 92% Gram-negative Escherichia coli 90% 87% Klebsiella pneumoniae 91% 100% Proteus mirabilis 70% 90% Pseudomonas aeruginosa 100% 90% Note: Based on a study of 244 patients who received ceftaroline and 227 who received vancomycin/aztreonam (vanco/az).
A Bacitracin susceptibility can be helpful in differentiating Streptococcus pyogenes from other beta-streptococci.
Increasing methylase-mediated resistance to macrolides in Streptococcus pyogenes in a children's hospital in Barcelona (Spain)] Enferm Infecc Microbiol Clin 2006;24:26-28.

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