streptococcal toxic shock syndrome


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streptococcal toxic shock syndrome

a toxic syndrome characterized by hypotension and a variety of signs and symptoms indicative of multiorgan failure including cerebral dysfunction, renal failure, acute respiratory distress syndrome, toxic cardiomyopathy, and hepatic dysfunction. The syndrome is usually precipitated by local infections of skin or soft tissue by streptococci; mortality of 30% has been reported.

streptococcal toxic shock syndrome

a toxic syndrome characterized by hypotension and a variety of signs and symptoms indicative of multiorgan failure including cerebral dysfunction, renal failure, acute respiratory distress syndrome, toxic cardiomyopathy, and hepatic dysfunction. The syndrome is usually precipitated by local infections of skin or soft tissue by streptococci; mortality of 30% has been reported.

strep·to·coc·cal tox·ic shock syn·drome

(strep'tō-kok'ăl tok'sik shok sin'drōm)
A toxic syndrome characterized by hypotension and a variety of signs and symptoms indicative of multiorgan failure including cerebral dysfunction, renal failure, acute respiratory distress syndrome, toxic cardiomyopathy, and hepatic dysfunction. The syndrome is usually precipitated by local infections of skin or soft tissue by streptococci; a mortality rate of 30% has been reported.

strep·to·coc·cal tox·ic shock syn·drome

(strep'tō-kok'ăl tok'sik shok sin'drōm)
Condition characterized by hypotension and signs and symptoms indicative of multiorgan failure including cerebral dysfunction, renal failure, acute respiratory distress syndrome, and hepatic dysfunction; usually precipitated by local infections of skin or soft tissue by streptococci.
References in periodicals archive ?
For example, county public health department staff recorded the diagnosis of streptococcal toxic shock syndrome.
There are at least 517,000 deaths globally each year due to severe Strep-A infections; necrotizing fasciitis kills about 30 percent of patients and streptococcal toxic shock syndrome has a mortality rate of 30 to 70 percent.
Invasive GAS disease is often life threatening; mortality rate is [approximately equal to] 10%-15% in industrialized countries, increasing to up to 50% in the presence of streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (1,2).
Association of phenotypic and genotypic characteristics of invasive Streptococcus pyogenes isolates with clinical components of streptococcal toxic shock syndrome.
Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, alcoholism, young age, and infection with emm/M3 types were independently associated with increased risk for streptococcal toxic shock syndrome.
Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome caused by Streptococcus suis serotype 2.
Although group A Streptococcus (GAS) most commonly causes pharyngitis and soft tissue infections (1), it also produces severe invasive disease including bacteremia, pneumonia, necrotizing fasciitis (NF), and streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS), especially at the extremes of age (2,3).
equi subsp, zooepidemicus included outbreaks of foodborne diseases (6,7), meningitis, septicemia, arthritis, pneumonia, glomerulonephritis, and streptococcal toxic shock syndrome, in both immunocompromised and immunocompetent patients (1,2,8,9).
The Yibin cluster consisted of 1 farmer who slaughtered a sick pig and became ill with streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS); another person who processed meat from the same pig became ill with meningitis and recovered.
sepsis, bacteremic pneumonia, and dramatic, rapidly progressive syndromes such as necrotizing fasciitis and streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS).
In particular, the emergence of streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS) during the 1980s is frequently cited as an example of increasing severity (4).