cryptography

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cryptography

(krip-tog′ră-fē) [ crypt- + -graphy]
The science and techniques of concealing or disguising information through encoding and decoding. In the health professions cryptography is used to ensure the confidentiality of medical records.
References in periodicals archive ?
To improve the detection performance for content-adaptive JPEG steganography further, in this paper, a steganalysis method is proposed based on evolution feature selection and classifier ensemble selection.
Since, with medical information both cryptography and steganography can be used to protect patient information as well as the medical results.
This makes steganography a lucrative technique for malicious actors when it comes to choosing the way to exfiltrate data from an attacked network.
While for stego image the process of steganography was the cause of reduction of its quality (Voloshynovskiy et al.
Modification of sustainable steganography algorithm which robust against disturbance of steganography transformation into a spatial domain of cover image.
Steganography is a technique that can be used to transmit secret information publicly via digital media, while achieving covert communication [1], There has been much advancement made in image steganography algorithms.
Sandhu, "An improved lsb based steganography technique for rgb color images," International Journal of Computer and Communication Engineering, vol.
OpenPuff is an open source steganography tool that can be downloaded from here.
Because steganography uses slack space and other areas of these common file formats but doesn't affect the content itself, it is extremely difficult to detect.
Moore said he built Secretbook to demonstrate that JPEG steganography can be performed on social media where it has previously been impossible.
Gopalan, "Audio Steganography using bit modification", IEEE International Conference on Acoustics, Speech, & Signal Processing, April, 2003.