Stanford-Binet IQ test

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Stanford-Binet IQ test

(stăn′fŭrd-bĭ-nā′)
[A. Binet, Fr. psychologist, 1857–1911; Stanford University, where the original test was revised by Louis Terman in 1916]
A commonly used test of cognitive abilities. It assesses verbal and nonverbal reasoning by subtests that assess a person's language fluency, three-dimensional thought processes, and pattern recognition skills. The test was first used in the late 1800s as an approximate means of classifying and comparing intellectual function in broad groups of people. It has been revised many times since then and is used for a variety of purposes, including the classification of military recruits and the assessment of individuals thought to have subnormal intelligence.
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Procedure: Initially 1500 children were taken for the study and sixty children (20 intellectually superior, 20 average and 20 mildly retarded) were finally selected after screening from different government and private schools of Ranchi district, Stanford Binet Test of Intelligence (revised L.
London, Feb 9 ( ANI ): A three-year-old girl from Guildford, Surrey, who scored 162 in the Stanford Binet test, has been unveiled as the one of the youngest ever members of high IQ society Mensa.
Since the 1905 Stanford Binet, significant progress almost has been nil.
The focus of this issue of "Systems Newsletter" is serving highly/exceptionally/profoundly gifted learners, those students who score 3+ standard deviations above the mean on the Stanford Binet 5th edition.
Eight of the 15 children participated in a Mullen Scales of Early Learning, (32) five (33%) participated in one of three Wechsler scales of intelligence (WISC-III, (52) WISC-IV, (53) WASI, (36)) and one participated in a Stanford Binet Scale of Intelligence.
at 3 and 5 years of age) were measured using the Stanford Binet test (Canfield et al.
When the analysis-synthesis score was compared to the Stanford Binet IV Abstract Visual Reasoning, Stanford Binet IV Quantitative Reasoning, and the WISC-R for a group of 9 year olds, the concurrent validities were 0.
Children over 16 years were administered the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale -- Revised (WAIS-R, Wechsler, 1981), and some participants received the Stanford Binet -- Fourth Edition (Thorndike, Hagen, & Sattler, 1986).
Two frequently administered intelligence tests are the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children -- Third Edition (WISC-III; Wechsler, 1991) and the Stanford Binet Intelligence Scale -- Fourth Edition (SB-FE; Thorndike, Hagan, & Sattler, 1986), both of which replace a line of earlier versions.
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