Kirlian photography

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Kirlian photography

a photographic technique in which a high-voltage current passed over a subject in contact with photographic film or paper produces an image surrounded by a luminous radiation, or aura, which some claim is a bioenergetic field that can reveal information about the subject's physical health and emotional state.
A technique for producing a picture from high voltage, named after S. Kirlian, an electrician from Kuban, Russia. In 1939, Kirlian accidentally discovered that placing an object or body part on undeveloped film laying on top of an aluminium plate connected to a source of high voltage resulted in an image characterised by small corona discharges

Kirlian photography,

n.pr technique named after Seymon Kirlian, which involves photographing subjects in a high-frequency, low-amperage electrical field, which display bright emanations usually around the fingers or toes.
References in periodicals archive ?
14) Alison Ferris, 'Disembodied Spirits: Spirit Photography and Rachel Whiteread's Ghost, Art Journal, vol.
This first phase of spirit photography essentially was commercial, and marked by several well-publicized court trials.
One location of particular importance for the promotion of Spiritualism and spirit photography, both in the nineteenth century as well as today, is the Lily Dale Assembly located in South Western New York State.
By contrast with some versions of popular, women-sponsored mid-nineteenth-century spiritualism, spirit photography relied upon its scientific basis to prove that spirits beyond the grave existed.
From spirit photography to home movies, the photographic record has always served as a means of rescuing the likenesses of loved ones from oblivion.
Today we publish the first of our finalists in our Capture the Spirit photography competition.
If Larson's approach to spirit photography evinces an overtly Barthesian concern for the medium's indexical basis, it equally reflects an awareness of the challenges posed to photography's evidentiary status in the twenty-five years since Camera Lucida's publication, by both postmodern critiques of representation and the rise of digital imaging.
Iconic coast and country images of Redcar and Cleveland have been snapped by readers as part of our Capture The Spirit photography competition.
Or send a copy to us at Capture the Spirit Photography Competition, Promotions Department, 106 Borough Road, Middlesbrough, TS1 3AZ.
Along with the photographs of Louise Halevy reading and sleeping, these small prints are the ones that resonate most eerily with such nineteenth-century oddities as mesmerism and spirit photography.
Or send a copy to Capture the Spirit Photography Competition, Promotions Department, 106 Borough Road, Middlesbrough, TS1 3AZ.
Or send a copy to us at: Capture the Spirit Photography Competition, Promotions Department, 106 Borough Road, Middlesbrough, TS1 3AZ.