ischial spine

(redirected from Spine of ischium)

is·chi·al spine

[TA]
a pointed process from the posterior border of the ischium on a level with the lower border of the acetabulum; gives attachment to the coccygeus muscle and sacrospinous ligament; the pudendal nerve passes dorsal to the ischial spine, which is palpable per vagina or rectum, and thus is used as a target for the needle tip in administering a pudendal nerve block.

is·chi·al spine

(is'kē-ăl spīn) [TA]
A pointed process from the posterior border of the ischium on a level with the lower border of the acetabulum; gives attachment to the sacrospinous ligament; the pudendal nerve passes dorsal to the ischial spine, which is palpable per vaginam or per rectum, and thus is used as a target for the needle-tip in administering a pudendal nerve block.

ischial spine

The spine of the ischium, a pointed eminence on its posterior border.
See also: spine

spine, spina

1. a thornlike process or projection.
2. the backbone, or vertebral column. See also spinal.

cuneal spine
the axial ridge of the upper surface of the frog in the hoof of the horse that projects into the digital cushion.
iliac spine
small salients along the dorsal and ventral borders of the ilium, divided into cranial and caudal, dorsal and ventral, in cats and dogs, contrasted to the single sacral and coxal tubers in large animals.
ischial spine
the crest of bone to which the sacrosciatic ligament attaches and which provides the origin of the gluteus profundus muscle.
plant s's
cause cutaneous laceration and subcutaneous abscess, oral mucosal laceration and ulceration, conjunctival injury.
scapular spine
the ridge that divides the lateral surface of the scapula into the supraspinous and infraspinous fossae.