whorl

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whorl

 [hwerl]
a spiral arrangement, as in the ridges on the finger that make up a fingerprint.

whorl

(wŏrl),
1. A turn of the spiral cochlea of the ear.
2. Synonym(s): vortex of heart
3. A turn of a concha nasalis.
4. Synonym(s): verticil
5. An area of hair growing in a radial manner suggesting whirling or twisting. Synonym(s): vortex (2)
6. One of the distinguishing patterns composing the Galton system of classification of fingerprints. Synonym(s): digital whorl

whorl

(wôrl, wûrl)
n.
1. A form that coils or spirals; a curl or swirl.
2. A turn of the cochlea or of the ethmoidal crest.
3. An area of hair growing in a radial manner.
4. One of the circular ridges or convolutions of a fingerprint.

whorl

[(h)wurl]
Etymology: ME, hwarwy
a spiral turn, such as one of the turns of the cochlea or of the dermal ridges that form fingerprints.

whorl

(wŏrl)
1. A turn of the spiral cochlea of the ear.
2. Synonym(s): vortex of heart.
3. A turn of a concha nasalis.
4. Synonym(s): verticil.
5. An area of hair growing in a radial manner suggesting whirling or twisting.
Synonym(s): vortex (2) .
6. One of the distinguishing patterns in the Galton system of classification of fingerprints.
See also: hair whorls

whorl

a circular set (two or more) of leaves or SEPALS arising at the same level on the plant.

whorl

(wŏrl)
Turn of the spiral cochlea of the ear.

whorl

a spiral arrangement, as in the hairs that go to make up a cowlick.
References in periodicals archive ?
Comparable wheel models have been found in 1938 in the Vucedol level of the adjacent Gradac (stronghold) at Vucedol (Schmidt 1945: 102-3, plate 48: 8-10; spindle-whorls Schmidt 1945: 102, plate 48: 2-7).
Other indicators for the age of Horizon V include an abundance of highly decorated spindle-whorls and the total absence of clay pipes.
Spindle-whorls are found in the contemporary Temple level IX ('Ubaid 3), and the earlier Temple XIV level ('Ubaid 2 or Hajji Muhammad period) (Safar et al.