sensitization

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sensitization

 [sen″sĭ-tĭ-za´shun]
2. exposure to allergen that results in the development of hypersensitivity.
3. the coating of erythrocytes with antibody so that they are subject to lysis by complement in the presence of homologous antigen, the first stage of a complement fixation test.
autoerythrocyte sensitization see autoerythrocyte sensitization syndrome.

sen·si·ti·za·tion

(sen'si-ti-zā'shŭn),
1. Immunization, especially with reference to antigens (immunogens) not associated with infection; the induction of acquired sensitivity or of allergy.
2. In substance use/abuse parlance, the increased response seen to subsequent administration of the substance.

sensitization

/sen·si·ti·za·tion/ (sen″sĭ-tĭ-za´shun)
1. administration of an antigen to induce a primary immune response.
2. exposure to allergen that results in the development of hypersensitivity.

autoerythrocyte sensitization  see painful bruising syndrome, under syndrome.

sensitization

[sen′sitīzā′shən]
Etymology: L, sentire + Gk, izein, to cause
1 reaction in which specific antibodies develop in response to an antigen. Allergic reactions result from excess sensitization to a foreign protein. Sensitization can be induced by immunization, in which a pathogen that has been made noninfectious is introduced into the body. See also active sensitization.
2 a photodynamic method of destroying microorganisms through the use of substances, such as fluorescent dyes, that absorb light and emit energy at wavelengths destructive to the organisms.
3
Usage notes: nontechnical.
anaphylaxis. sensitize, v.

sensitization

Immunology The process in which a person acquires the ability to react to an antigen, usually of nonself origin. See Secondary–immune response. Cf Primary–immune response.

sen·si·ti·za·tion

(sen'si-tī-zā'shŭn)
Immunization, especially with reference to antigens (immunogens) not associated with infection; the induction of acquired sensitivity or of allergy.

sensitization

The preliminary exposure of a person to an ALLERGEN that leads to ANTIBODY production by the immune system and, on subsequent exposure, to an ALLERGIC or hypersensitivity reaction. Immunoglobulin Type E (IgE) is the main type of antibody involved.

sensitization

the state in which an enhanced IMMUNE RESPONSE is provoked by a second exposure to an ANTIGEN. This may be an allergic response (see ALLERGY).

sensitization

induction of allergy (i.e. acquired sensitivity)

sensitization,

n 1., a reaction in which exposure to an antigen produces antibodies; can be induced by immunization, in which an attenuated pathogen is introduced into the body.
2., a photodynamic method of killing microbes by the use of fluorescent dyes that emit energy at wavelengths damaging to them.

sensitization 

1. A state or condition in which the response to a second or later stimulus (e.g. a drug) is greater than the response to the original stimulus (e.g. first administration of the drug). 2. The process in which exposure to an antigen results in the development of hypersensitivity.

sen·si·ti·za·tion

(sen'si-tī-zā'shŭn)
1. Immunization, especially with reference to antigens (immunogens) not associated with infection; induction of acquired sensitivity or of allergy.
2. In substance use/abuse parlance, increased response seen to subsequent administration of the substance.

sensitization (sen´sitizā´shun),

n the process of rendering a cell sensitive to the action of a complement by subjecting it to the action of a specific amboceptor; anaphylaxis.

sensitization

a state in which the body is sensitized to particular stimuli, e.g. (1) certain individuals exposed to some antigens by a particular route elicit an immune response which may be antibody-mediated, particularly IgE, or cell-mediated which sensitizes them such that subsequent exposure to the same antigen elicits an allergic response; said especially of such exposure resulting in a hypersensitivity reaction. (2) The coating of cells with antibody as a preparatory step to some detectable reaction such as their lysis if complement is added. (3) The preparation of a tissue or organ by one hormone so that it will respond functionally to the action of another.

active sensitization
the sensitization that results from the injection, ingestion or inhalation, of antigen into the animal. See also active immunity, active immunization.
passive sensitization
that which results when blood serum from a sensitized animal is injected into a normal animal. See also passive immunity, passive immunization.
protein sensitization
that bodily state in which the individual is sensitive or hypersusceptible to some foreign protein, so that when there is absorption of that protein a typical reaction is set up.

Patient discussion about sensitization

Q. I had cataract surgery with iol implant, and ever since I have awful light sensitivity. Any ideas? I can't go into a "super store" without my sunglasses. My eyes ache at the end of the day. My doctor says "I don't know!"

A. May sound a bit silly question, but have you tried to consult your ophthalmologist (eye doctor, e.g. the one that performed the operation) about it? Cataract surgery, although considered very successful, isn't problem-free. Primary physician may not have the necessary specialization to deal with these subjects.

Q. I heard that patients are highly sensitive to their senses? what are the most common symptoms of fibromyalgia and can they be aggravated? I heard that patients are highly sensitive to their senses?

A. Great answeer...couldn't agree more!

Q. when my aunt went through chemo (for colon cancer) her palms became VERY sensitive and had a burning feeling is there any way to prevent this from happening to my mom who is starting her chemo now? If not, what it the best treatment for it?

A. What you describe sounds like peripheral neuropathy, a well known side effect of platinum chemotherapy which is used for colon cancer. Several measures, including giving infusion of calcium and magnesium, and glutathione were found to reduce the rate of this complication, although further studies are necessary.

However, the information is only general advice, since I haven't examined your mother so if you have any questions about this subject, it may be wise to consult a doctor (e.g. oncologist).

You may read more here:
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/cancerchemotherapy.html

More discussions about sensitization