spicy food

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Any comestible marinated in and/or which contains chili peppers, mustard with horseradish, curry or other spices that evoke a desired intraoral sensation. Spicy foods may evoke a brisk autonomic nervous system response—e.g., diaphoresis, arrhythmias

spicy food

Nutrition Any comestible marinated in and/or which contains chili peppers, mustard with horseradish, curry or other spices that evoke a desired intraoral sensation that crosses pain with pleasure; SFs may elicit an autonomic nervous system response–eg, diaphoresis, arrhythmias. See Capsaicin, Scoville units, Seder syncope, Sushi syncope.
References in periodicals archive ?
The findings, published in the journal Hypertension, showed that compared to those who least enjoyed spicy foods, participants with a high spicy preference had lower blood pressure and consumed less salt than participants who had a low spicy preference.
Significant difference was seen between income groups and higher intake of fried and spicy foods respectively.
They found that, compared to those who least enjoyed spicy foods, participants with a high spicy preference had 8 mm Hg lower systolic (upper) and 5mm Hg lower diastolic (bottom) blood pressure numbers.
His interest in chile peppers and spicy foods which has helped make Dave one of the foremost authorities in the world and popular known as the 'Pope of Peppers'.
Stress and spicy foods appeared to play a major role in their occurrence.
Capsaicin (trans-8-metil-vanillyl-6-nonenamida) is the main pungent active substance of spicy foods such as chili, pepper, and kimchi.
Almost all types of fatty and spicy foods are in the list of foods that cause acid reflux and call for avoidance.
Studies show that the more you eat, the less sensitive you might be to spicy foods.
Eating spicy foods works differently it raises your internal temperature to match the temperature outside.
Collectively, these reports indicate spices may have a significant influence on morbidity and mortality in humans; however, evidence relating to the effect of daily consumption of spicy foods on mortality in prospective studies is lacking.
People who ate spicy food three to seven times a week and those who ate spicy food once or twice a week were 14 and 10 percent, respectively, less likely to die than participants who ate spicy foods less than once a week, according to a study of almost 490,000 participants, ages 30 to 79, by researchers from the Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences.
These observational data don't establish that spicy foods reduce mortality.