Rehabilitation of Offenders Act 1974

(redirected from Spent conviction)

Rehabilitation of Offenders Act 1974

An Act of (UK) Parliament, which allows as a public policy some criminal convictions to be “spent” after a rehabilitation period (RP), so those convicted of relatively minor offence aren’t faced with lifelong effects of past transgressions.

The RP is determined by the sentence, and begins on the date of the conviction. If there has been no further conviction during the RP, the conviction is spent and, with certain exceptions, need not be disclosed by the ex-offender in any context such as job applications, obtaining insurance, or in civil proceedings. For adults (over 18), the RP is 5 years for non-prison sentences, 7 years for prison sentences of up to 6 months, and 10 years for prison sentences of up to 2 years; convictions are never spent for prison sentences of more than 2 years. For offenders under 18, the RP is usually half that for adults.
References in periodicals archive ?
But, the AFL player was fined $3500 plus $188 in costs, $1000 of which will go to Bowen, but he was granted a spent conviction by Campione to allow him to avoid a criminal record.
The conviction was a spent conviction in November 2012 and not in my mind when I stood for police and crime commissioner in Greater Manchester.
He said despite a spent conviction for deception 17 years ago, Stanger is respectable.
The evidence of a spent conviction is a fair indicator that the individual has done something sufficiently bad (or stupid) in the past.
While there have been two national inquiries--one focusing on human rights and discriminatory aspects and the other on spent conviction regimes (11)--the issue has yet clearly to enter the broader community consciousness.
There is no such thing as a spent conviction in US law.
There was also one spent conviction for dangerous driving and four offences coded as 'other'.
The spent conviction will still exist on record, but will not have to be disclosed at job interviews.
The court heard he had a previous, spent conviction dating back to 1994 of indecent assault upon a male.
Therefore, even travellers with a spent conviction are not eligible to travel visa-free.
The court was told King had a spent conviction for a similar offence.
Failing to disclose a spent conviction is not good grounds for dismissing or refusing to employ someone.