lip reading

(redirected from Speechreading)
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reading

 [rēd´ing]
understanding of written or printed symbols representing words.
lip reading (speech reading) understanding of speech through observation of the speaker's lip movements.

speech reading

use by people with hearing impairment of nonauditory clues as to what is being said through observing the speaker's facial expressions, lip and jaw movements, and other gestures.
Synonym(s): lip reading

lip reading

speech read·ing

(spēch rēd'ing)
Use, by people with hearing impairments, of nonauditory clues as to what is being said, acquired by observing the speaker's facial expressions, lip and jaw movements, and other gestures.
Synonym(s): lip reading.

speech read·ing

(spēch rēd'ing)
Use, by people with hearing impairments, of nonauditory clues as to what is being said, acquired by observing the speaker's facial expressions and gestures.
Synonym(s): lip reading.
References in periodicals archive ?
She also relies on speechreading cues and requires clear, slowed speech with no background noise for effective communication.
She should receive audiotherapy and attend a speechreading class.
and it will be taught by Ginny Craig, a very experienced speechreading teacher and Southeastern Pennsylvania Coordinator of Self-Help for the Hard-of-Hearing (S-H-H-H).
The greater the severity of loss, the less effective a hearing aid is in helping an individual receive and understand information through sound alone, and the more the individual must rely on speechreading, manual communication, gestures, writing, or all of these methods to communicate with hearing people.
The results showed that the tracking rate in Swedish increased from around 40 words per minute with speechreading alone to 60 to 65 words per minute with speechreading plus the tactile aid.
Other countries used oral methods--reliant on speech and speechreading.
Past the critical period for language learning, most late-deafened adults do not develop a reliable mode of communication, whether in speechreading or manual communication.
Oralists maintain that only the use of speech and speechreading can successfully integrate deaf people with hearing people in our society.
Using the telecoil, telephone enhancements of one kind or another, a television listening system, and speechreading as much as possible are all going to be helpful.
Telephone communication can pose a unique problem for individuals with heating loss in that they are required to rely totally on their damaged auditory system rather than being able to benefit from visual cues and speechreading.
Cued speech is an adjunctive system which aids in speechreading by using handshapes around the face to represent consonant sounds, and positions about the face to represent vowel sounds.
These include techniques that can enhance use of interpreters, speechreading, use of residual hearing, and group work.